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I guess this is more hypothetical than practical, but I was wondering if it's possible to use a switch statement that returns 'true' or 'false' inside 'assert'. I realize there are better ways to do this, but I want to look at this problem in terms of error handling, rather than sanitizing user input.

For example, consider a Date class that takes input setting the date. In the SetDate() member function of the class, I would like to put an 'assert' that would handle errors caused by input such as "13" for the month, or 30 days for month "2" (February). It would be trivial to write a switch statement that does this:

switch(nMonth){
     case 1:
     case 3:(etc)
        if(nDay>=1 && nDay <=31)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
        (etc)
        default:
            return false;
         }

Assuming the switch statement works as desired, what do I need to do to make it work in an 'assert' error handling scheme? I tried it as is, but (not surprisingly) it didn't compile.

Edit: @Yu Hao: That's how I fixed it. I used a bool function.

bool TestDate(int nMonth, int nDay, int nYear){
        switch(nMonth){
                case 1:
                case 3:
                case 5:
                case 7:
                case 8:
                case 10:
                case 12:
                    if(nDay >=1 && nDay <=31)
                        return true;
                    break;
                case 4:
                case 6:
                case 9:
                case 11:
                     if(nDay >=1 && nDay <=30)
                        return true;
                     break;
                case 2:
                     if((nYear % 400 == 0) || ((nYear % 100 !=0) &&(nYear % 4 == 0))){
                        if(nDay >=1 && nDay <=29)
                            return true;}
                     else if(nDay >=1 && nDay <=28)
                        return true;
                     else
                        return false;
                     break;
                default:
                    return false;

        }
        return 0;
    }
    Date(int nMonth = 1, int nDay = 1, int nYear = 1970){
        assert(TestDate(nMonth,nDay,nYear));
        m_nMonth = nMonth;
        m_nDay = nDay;
        m_nYear = nYear;
    }
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You could put it in a lambda, but I see little point. –  chris Jan 18 at 4:53
    
That switch statement in TestDate() is pretty ugly - all the cases fall through if the tests aren't met, but it happens to work because if any of the early tests fail, the subsequent ones will fail as well. Maybe it was designed that way, but it seems like it was a lucky accident. –  Michael Burr Jan 18 at 6:42
    
@Michael: I put in "break" statements in the appropriate places, but the gcc compiler gave a warning:"Control reaches the end of a non-void function". I didn't get any warning when the "break" statements were omitted. –  Huaidan Jan 18 at 8:51
    
@Huaidan: that's because you need a return false; just before the end of the function. Before you added break statements, most bad dates would fall through to the default: case - but like I said that seemed to be mostly a lucky accident. With the break statements, there's no fall through so most bad entries break out of the switch and simply go to the end of the function. –  Michael Burr Jan 18 at 9:10
    
:P return 0;...Hope that's better! –  Huaidan Jan 18 at 9:10

2 Answers 2

switch statements have no return values, the return false or such statements in the switch statement applies to the function that they are in. So you can't use a switch inside assert, but you can put the function that this switch statement is in inside assert.

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You can't use switch inside assert. assert takes an expression. switch is a statement, not an expression.

What you can do is use the trinary operator. It will not be pretty if your switch statement is large.

assert (((nMonth==1) || (nMonth == 3) || (nMonth == 5) || …) ?
         ((nDay >= 1) && (nDay <= 31) :
        (nMonth==2) ? ((nDay >= 1) && (nDay <= 28) :
        …);
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