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I am trying to display a page which has two sections which are scrollable. What I am seeing is that the lower section gets a scroll bar but it is truncated. When I change the height property of the section, from 90% to 50% then the complete scroll bar is shown. However, if I resize the browser to smaller size, the vertical scroll bar again appears truncated. The CSS for the top most div is supposed to have a height in pixels.

.rootsection {
    background-color: yellow;
    padding: 5px;
    margin: 5px;
    overflow:hidden;
    width: 100%;
    height: 200px;   
}

The CSS for the scrollable div is:

.bottomSectionScrollable{
    background-color: green;    
    overflow:auto !important;
    padding: 5px;
    margin: 5px;
    height: 90%;    
}

When the height is changed to 50% and the root section height is unchanged to 200px, I see that the scroll bar is not truncated. I want that the scrollable section should always have a vertical scroll bar which is never truncated and it should not leave a blank space. This should be the case even when the browser is re-sized or the zoom / un-zoom action is done on the user. I am emulating the re-size action by changing the height of the root section.

FIDDLE

Any thoughts on how to ensure that the scrollable section's scroll bars are always visible and always occupy the full space of the parent box even when the browser is re-sized?

share|improve this question
    
No wonder you don't get any other answers. Well done @Saurabh Talwalkar –  Nicholas Hazel Jan 18 at 5:48
    
I am sorry, I posted a wrong link of JSFiddle. I have updated the link which shows the green scroll bar truncated when the height of the green div is 90%. If you click on the Fiddle link again,you can see the truncated scroll bar –  stalwalk Jan 18 at 11:16

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