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I have created a structure of different data types and i want to return each type of data. does this can be done using a function template which takes a different data argument not included in structure or no arguments?

I have something like this,

struct mystruct{
int _int;
char _c;
string _str
};

In function template(int i)
{
     mystruct s;

      switch (getInput)
     {
      case 1:
        return s._int;
      case 2:
        return s._c;
      case 3:
        return s._str;
   }   
} 

void main()  

{
   int getInput = 1;
   //pass getInput value to function template
}
share|improve this question
2  
It would help to add an example of what you're trying to achieve. – Georg Fritzsche Jan 22 '10 at 19:59
1  
I don't quite understand your question. What is a structure of different data types? What do you want to do with it? – Mathieu Pagé Jan 22 '10 at 19:59
1  
It's not clear to me what you want, can you explain in more detail? A function template allows you to implement generic functions and if so desirable specialized variants for certain data types. – wich Jan 22 '10 at 19:59
    
I think he needs a variant type. He can always warp his brain around Boost variants. Or, for added fun, he can use void* as a pointer to whatever. – Eduardo León Jan 22 '10 at 20:27
1  
Would it be possible to put this in more context? Like, what you need to do as a goal? – GManNickG Jan 22 '10 at 20:32
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes:

template<class T>
T f() {
  return 0; // for the sake of example
}

int main() {
  return f<int>(); // specify the template parameter
}

template<class T>
vector<T> another_example();
// use another_example<int>() which returns a vector<int>
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I was thinking. – GManNickG Jan 22 '10 at 20:00
    
We'll see if I interpreted him correctly.. :) – Roger Pate Jan 22 '10 at 20:01
    
I found another way of reading it, I think. :) It's on, now. – GManNickG Jan 22 '10 at 20:02
    
I bet it has nothing with templates to do at all ;) I'll give you +1 anyhow. – Skurmedel Jan 22 '10 at 20:02

The following is building of GMan's (now deleted) interpretation of your very confusing question:

struct some_data
{
    int i;
    char c;
    std::string s;
};

template< typename T > struct Getter;
template<> struct Getter<int> { static int& get(some_data& data) {return data.i} };
template<> struct Getter<char> { static char& get(some_data& data) {return data.c} };
template<> struct Getter<std::string> { static std::string& get(some_data& data) {return data.s} };

template< typename T >
inline T get(some_data& data) {return Getter<T>::get(data);}

I'm not sure. though, whether this is what you were asking for.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Almost exactly what I was writing up. (P.S. I'm deleting my answer since yours is best, you should remove the link to mine.) – GManNickG Jan 22 '10 at 20:23
1  
I'm not sure this is right, because it seems he wants to determine the type at runtime (I'm basing this on getInput meaning input from the user); but as we know, that isn't possible. You can also specialize get directly, since it doesn't require partial specialization. – Roger Pate Jan 22 '10 at 20:28
    
I guess I would go with using the return f<typename>(); specifying the return type at compile time. – cpx Jan 22 '10 at 20:36

What I understand is the following: I want to create a function whose return type depends on its parameter(s). Well, technically, you can't.

  1. When those return types are classes with a common ancestor, you could return a pointer to that ancestor. It's not quite the same thing, but it works. Unfortunately, two of the return types are char and int, which are not classes in first place.

  2. When those return types are plain old data types, you could return a tagged union. Unfortunately, one of the return types is std::string, which is not a plain old data type.

  3. A solution that works with any type but is incredibly hacker-ish is to use void*. Well, unfortunately, void* is error-prone. Whoever maintains your code will curse you forever if you use void*.

  4. A final solution (pun not intended) that works is to use boost::variant. It's quite complicated, but at least it's safe (unlike void*), because type errors can be checked at compile time.

share|improve this answer

Here is another interpretation that doesn't use templates:

struct some_data
{
    int i;
    char c;
    std::string s;

    void get(int& value) const
         { value = i; }
    void get(char& value) const
         { value = c; }
    void get(& value) const
         { value = s; }
};

// ...
some_data received_data;
int k;
received_data.get(k);
//...
received_data.s = "Hello";
std::string world;
received_data.get(world);
std::cout << world << std::endl;

The compiler will generate the correct method calls based on the type of the argument. This can be translated into non-member functions:

void Get_Some_Data(char& value, const some_data& sd)
{
    value = sd.c;
    return;
}


void Get_Some_Data(int& value, const some_data& sd)
{
    value = sd.i;
    return;
}

void Get_Some_Data(std::string& value, const some_data& sd)
{
    value = sd.s;
    return;
}

//...
char f;
Get_Some_Data(f, received_data);
share|improve this answer
    
Can simplify to codepad.org/gftYzDSI. – Roger Pate Jan 22 '10 at 21:54

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