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So heres my code:

#include <iostream>

class cBase
{
    public:
    void vf(int)
    {
        std::cout << "cBase\n";
    }
};

class cDerived : public cBase
{
    public:
    void vf(int)
    {
        std::cout << "cDerived\n";
    }
};

int main()
{
    cBase b;
    cDerived d;

    b.vf(0);
    d.vf(0);
}

This example hides the function vf() of the base class and calls the vf() function of the derived class. Heres another piece of code:

#include <iostream>

class cBase
{
    public:
    virtual void vf(int)
    {
        std::cout << "cBase\n";
    }
};

class cDerived : public cBase
{
    public:
    void vf(int)
    {
        std::cout << "cDerived\n";
    }
};

int main()
{
    cBase b;
    cDerived d;

    b.vf(0);
    d.vf(0);
}

Now, the vf() function of the derived class overrides the vf() function of the vase class.

So my question is: what is the point of virtual functions if i can achieve the same result with the default hiding mechanism of c++? Am i missing something here? Thanks in advance!

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4  
cBase *b = new cDerived; b->vf(0); <= try this with both your samples. –  Mat Jan 18 at 12:25
    
The virtual method guarantees that, if a derived class has the same function, the program will use the derived function. –  Gasim Jan 18 at 12:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To make polymorphism work you need to work on pointers or references. When you use dot operator on object that is neither pointer or reference then virtual table is not used to call proper virtual function.

To see how it works, create derived object dynamically, assign it to base class pointer and call your function on it. This will call implementation from your derived class.

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This isn't true, the dot operator call's the most derived version of a virtual function, even when used via a reference to a base class. –  Charles Bailey Jan 18 at 12:28
    
Right, forgot about reference –  marcin_j Jan 18 at 12:30

virtual functions give run time polymorphism. Your objects will not exhibit run time polymorphism which is when the same code using the same compile-time types can exhibit different behaviour based on the run time types of the objects in question. E.g:

void f(CBase& x) {
    x.vf(0);
}

Without vf being virtual in CBase, the CBase::vf will be called even if the run time type of x is CDerived.

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