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I am in the process of making a "game" in OpenGL when I recently discovered that I'm using almost 1.8 gigs of RAM, which is obviously far too high. Now I need to bring that down, but what should I look for that would cause such high RAM usage? I mean generic wise, IE creating a new object or something along that nature. I just have no idea where to begin looking!

Edit: I use a lot of display lists (around a 1000), but no I don't load a lot of textures. Just one Spritesheet. Its a voxel engine. I store block ids in the form of a byte, and I store 16^3 of these ids per chunk in an array. When I have around 1000 chunks the RAM usage sky rockets to a few gigs. I profiled my code and it seems that byte[] is taking up the most space, even though my arrays are byte[][][].

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It would be a huge help to us, if you could tell us some more about your game. Like what kind of things are you using which consume memory and a lot of it. Like are you create a huge amount of VAOs and VBOs? (creating a lot of buffers?) are you re-allocating a lot of buffers? are you loading a huge amount of textures? and so on. –  Vallentin Jan 18 at 16:54
    
I use a lot of display lists (around a 1000), but no I don't load a lot of textures. Just one Spritesheet. Its a voxel engine. I store block ids in the form of a byte, and I store 16^3 of these ids per chunk in an array. When I have around 1000 chunks the RAM usage sky rockets to a few gigs. I profiled my code and it seems that byte[] is taking up the most space, even though my arrays are byte[][][]. –  opiop65 Jan 18 at 16:57
    
Is 1.8 GB obvious too big? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 18 at 17:19
    
Um what? @Peter Lawrey –  opiop65 Jan 18 at 17:27
    
One thing that you should atleast thing about is to stop using Display Lists and start using VBOs and VAOs. –  Vallentin Jan 18 at 18:45

2 Answers 2

You don't have enough information to provide a detailed answer, but here are thoughts:

  1. 1.8 Gb is not necessarily bad or wrong. It depends on how much RAM is accessible to Java and gc parameter settings. GC generally runs faster with a bigger arena, so if your Java is looking at lots of free RAM, it could choose to grow the heap when otherwise it would collect. I do not have access to the current algorithm for expanding the heap, but the Oracle/Java 7+ team seems fine with letting Java consume lots of resources. E.g. the size of the JRE has grown quite a bit. Additionally, a 1.8Gb VM footprint doesn't mean much. The figure you should be concerned with is working set size, which corresponds to RAM that will be consumed while your program is running. The rest is at worst swap space on disk.

  2. It's likely that your 3d byte voxel arrays (16 on a side) are consuming 17*16*(4 or 8) = 1088 or 2176 bytes for pointers, which is something like 25 or 50% overhead. They are actually a 1d array of pointers to 1d arrays of pointers to 1d arrays of 16 bytes each. You can re-implement with a single 1d byte array and your own indexing math to save space.

  3. Display lists are deprecated in OpenGL 3.0 and dropped in 3.1 I don't have wide experience, but have run into two drivers where they're significantly slower than the code I wrote to generate them. If you have 1,000 lists and they're a megabyte each, there's a gigabyte that can never be collected.

  4. In lieu of display lists, look at moving as much data as you can to graphics card memory with VBOs etc.

  5. If you're running 64-bit java, consider dropping to 32. If you have any pointer-heavy data structures (like octrees for voxels), they'll shrink by nearly a factor of 2.

  6. I know you won't like this, but as a guy who's written a couple of Java/OpenGL systems (although with JOGL, not LWJGL), I've come to understand why commercial OpenGL apps - especially resource-intensive ones - are written in C++. And you've got one. Java isolates you from resource allocation and device details, which is nice 90% of the time and a real pain in the butt for the other 10%. As you say, setting pointers is necessary but not sufficient for structures to be collected. This is an example of "Java knows best."

  7. You (obviously) need a memory profiler. I've had good luck with the one built into Netbeans. I know there are similar capabilities for Eclipse, but have only used the one for Android. Unfortunately it's usually easier for a profiler to help you fix problems as you add to a code base than after the fact when you've hit a wall as in your case. Think about how you can disable or change intensity of use of parts of your engine and watch how memory utilization responds (if indeed you have a problem).

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1. Ok thank you, I was just worried because compared to other "engines" with similar features, my program uses far more RAM than them. 2.Sorry, I don't think I will switch over. I find I have a greater performance boost when using display lists. 4. But what about all the people that run my program using a 64 bit JVM? 5. I know, but I'm not going to learn a new language just to continue the engine. 6. I have one, but thank you! –  opiop65 Jan 18 at 17:50
    
@opiop65 See my addition at 2 also. –  Gene Jan 18 at 18:15
    
I've always been told the JVM flattens them for me though? –  opiop65 Jan 18 at 18:22
    
It's very possible I'm not up on current JVM optimizations, but I believe only the index calculation is flattened, not the memory footprint. E.g. if I declare a[][] = {{1,2},{3,4}};, I can then say a[0] = new int[100]; to make the array non-rectangular. How would this be implemented internally without pointers? I will try some tests. –  Gene Jan 18 at 18:46
    
Alright thank you! –  opiop65 Jan 18 at 18:49

you should watch out for objects that you are not using but they are still there . when you are done with an object O then O = null . you may also use a debugger to see all current objects .

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I've already done that. Setting objects to null actually helps nothing because the GC will kick in when it wants to, so it could potentially never free that object up. –  opiop65 Jan 18 at 16:58

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