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Today I stumbled on this javascript snippet.

var x = 5, y = 6;
x
++
y
alert (x + " " + y);

I would like to know why this doesn't throw a syntax error and more why y is 7 at the end? What is the use of this strange snippet if there are any at all?

JSFiddle here

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2  
    
My guess would be that after the x, the parser isn't expecting anything in particular so when it sees the line end, it adds an automatic semi-colon. But, after the ++, the parser is expecting another term so it keeps looking for that and finds the y. –  jfriend00 Jan 18 '14 at 18:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is due to automatic semi-colon insertion. Semi-colons are not optional in JavaScript. They simulate being optional by having the runtime add them for you.

The parser can only do so good a job at this. The basic algorithm is "if the line is a valid statement, then plop a semi-colon after it and execute it, if it's not, keep going onto the next line"

The parser turned that code into this:

var x = 5, y = 6;
x;
++
y;
alert (x + " " + y);

It's fashionable now to leave off semi-colons, but I still think that's a bad idea after years of coding in JS.

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+1 Posted just before me, but more detailed than I would have put :) –  Ashley Medway Jan 18 '14 at 18:39
    
"if the line is a valid statement, then plop a semi-colon after it and execute it, if it's not, keep going onto the next line" That is quite simply wrong. –  Pumbaa80 Jan 18 '14 at 18:57
3  
"The runtime can only do so good a job at this." The runtime doesn't do it at all. It's done while the JavaScript is parsed. And it does its job just fine, there are however rules it follows, and so the developer may not do so good a job at following the rules. Of course, any developer that writes code like this has deeper issues. –  cookie monster Jan 18 '14 at 19:12
    
@Pumbaa80 please elaborate. How is it wrong? It's a summary of a rather complex spec into one sentence. It will of course have some oversights and assumptions in it. –  Matt Greer Jan 18 '14 at 19:58
1  
@cookiemonster thanks, that is a valid point. Updating my answer. –  Matt Greer Jan 18 '14 at 19:58

I think, the cause is the Automatic Semicolon Insertion (ASI) of Javascript. The code is interpreted as follows:

var x = 5, y = 6;
x;
++y;
alert (x + " " + y);
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1  
The interesting part is that it is not interpreted as x++;y;, since the postfix ++ is explicitly listed as an exception ("restricted production"). –  Pumbaa80 Jan 18 '14 at 19:02

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