Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

ifstream::tellg() is returning -13 for a certain file.

Basically, I wrote a utility that analyzes some source code; I open all files alphabetically, I start with "Apple.cpp" and it works perfectly.. But when it gets to "Conversion.cpp", always on the same file, after reading one line successfully tellg() returns -13.

The code in question is:

for (int i = 0; i < files.size(); ++i) { /* For each .cpp and .h file */
   TextIFile f(files[i]);
   while (!f.AtEof()) // When it gets to conversion.cpp (not on the others)
                      // first is always successful, second always fails
      lines.push_back(f.ReadLine());

The code for AtEof is:

    bool AtEof() {
        if (mFile.tellg() < 0)
            FATAL(format("DEBUG - tellg(): %d") % mFile.tellg());
        if (mFile.tellg() >= GetSize())
            return true;

        return false;
    }

After it reads successfully the first line of Conversion.cpp, it always crashes with DEBUG - tellg(): -13.

This is the whole TextIFile class (wrote by me, the error may be there):

class TextIFile
{
public:
    TextIFile(const string& path) : mPath(path), mSize(0) {
        mFile.open(path.c_str(), std::ios::in);

        if (!mFile.is_open())
            FATAL(format("Cannot open %s: %s") % path.c_str() % strerror(errno));
    }

    string GetPath() const { return mPath; }
    size_t GetSize() { if (mSize) return mSize; const size_t current_position = mFile.tellg(); mFile.seekg(0, std::ios::end); mSize = mFile.tellg(); mFile.seekg(current_position); return mSize; }

    bool AtEof() {
        if (mFile.tellg() < 0)
            FATAL(format("DEBUG - tellg(): %d") % mFile.tellg());
        if (mFile.tellg() >= GetSize())
            return true;

        return false;
    }

    string ReadLine() {
        string ret;
        getline(mFile, ret);
        CheckErrors();
        return ret;
    }

    string ReadWhole() {
        string ret((std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(mFile)), std::istreambuf_iterator<char>());
        CheckErrors();
        return ret;
    }

private:
    void CheckErrors() {
        if (!mFile.good())
            FATAL(format("An error has occured while performing an I/O operation on %s") % mPath);
    }

    const string mPath;
    ifstream mFile;
    size_t mSize;
};

Platform is Visual Studio, 32 bit, Windows.

Edit: Works on Linux.

Edit: I found the cause: line endings. Both Conversion and Guid and others had \n instead of \r\n. I saved them with \r\n instead and it worked. Still, this is not supposed to happen is it?

share|improve this question
1  
iostreams sux. use something else :P –  Matt Joiner Jan 23 '10 at 0:02
    
Is it always this file or the Nth file opened? IOW, if you renamed conversion.cpp so it fell somewhere else in your sorted list would it still be the file to fail? –  Duck Jan 23 '10 at 0:07
    
Just out of interest, how long is Conversion.cpp and how long was the first line read? –  Charles Bailey Jan 23 '10 at 0:24
    
@Duck: renamed, it failed with Guid.h now.. Way down the list (there are ~10 files in between) –  Andreas Bonini Jan 23 '10 at 0:32
    
@Charles Bailey: this is Conversion.cpp - codepad.org/yfHwXD1h . The first line is /****...****/. Every single file in the project starts with that line. –  Andreas Bonini Jan 23 '10 at 0:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's difficult to guess without knowing exactly what's in Conversion.cpp. However, using < with stream positions is not defined by the standard. You might want to consider an explicit cast to the correct integer type before formatting it; I don't know what formatting FATAL and format() expect to perform or how the % operator is overloaded. Stream positions don't have to map in a predicatable way to integers, certainly not if the file isn't opened in binary mode.

You might want to consider an alternative implementation for AtEof(). Say something like:

bool AtEof()
{
    return mFile.peek() == ifstream::traits_type::eof();
}
share|improve this answer
    
format() is boost::format.. Looking inside mFile with the VS debugger _Fpos is -13 ... –  Andreas Bonini Jan 22 '10 at 23:56

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.