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I'm a newbie and I'am learning the C language. I get some errors when I compile the following code.

Constans.h

#define ERROR 0   
#define TRUE 1  
#define FALSE 0  
#define OK 1  
#define INFEASIBLE -1  
#define OVERFLOW -2  
typedef int Status;  

ArrayList.h

#include"Constans.h"  
#define LIST_INIT_SIZE 100  
#define LIST_INCREMENT 20  
typedef struct{  
int *elem;  
int length;  
int listsize;  
}SqList;  
extern Status InitList_sq(Sqlist *l);  
extern Status ListInsert_sq(Sqlist *l,int i,int e);  
extern Status ListDelete_sq(Sqlist *l,int i,int *e);  
extern void MergeList_sq(Sqlist La,Sqlist Lb,Sqlist *Lc);  
extern void ListTraverse(Sqlist l,void(*visit)(void));  

program.c

#include<stdio.h>  
#include "ArrayList.h"  
int main(){  
return 0;  
}  

enter image description here

My environment:
OS: Mac OS X 10.9.1 version
Editor: vim
Compiler:i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-gcc-4.2

I'm very sorry about my fault adding backslashs sign.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ingo Karkat, Seki, Shankar Damodaran, M42, Daniel Jan 24 at 13:30

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You do not need backslashes at the beginning of lines in front of the pound # sign. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 19 at 3:41
1  
duplicate of stackoverflow.com/q/21152539/838253 –  Milliways Jan 19 at 3:49
    
It isn't a duplicate of SO 21152539, though it is closely related. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 19 at 4:17
1  
Can you explain how you came up with an example that used the backslash notation? I've seen a lot of odd code over the years, but I don't recall seeing that before (mainly because it is wrong and simply doesn't work). Also, you should be able to copy and paste the code from the terminal, rather than embedding an image. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 19 at 4:18
    
What's up with the "??" in the terminal screenshot. If you're using international characters set your file encodings consistently, e.g. use utf-8 for the source as well as your terminal. Or even better just stick to ascii. –  Brandin Jan 19 at 5:42

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
SqList ≠ Sqlist

*unless you want unknown types in your code.

SqList needs to be consistent in the way it's used, otherwise it's not equal, or means the same thing.

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backslashes not needed. If you want to comment a line out use "//" instead.

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What's with the backslashes before the \#define etc? Remove them.

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You don't want to escape the pound signs in your #include and #define statements. the syntax is

#include "header.h"

#define THING 1

also, I am not certain, but I always thought you needed a space between #include and constants.h. so it would not be

#include"constants.h"

It would be

#include "constants.h"

I hope this is what you wanted to know.

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The spaces aren't required as pointed out by Jonathan Leffler earlier. :) ... "Actually, the space is not necessary (the tokenizer knows how to split the lines up without the space), but it is certainly conventional to put the space there (see the standard for examples)." –  l'L'l Jan 19 at 4:20
    
Oh, okay. I knew you could do that on commodore basic, but never really tried anywhere else. –  Wyatt8740 Jan 28 at 14:03

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