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I have the following code in C++ from a book/tutorial on OpenGL:

    for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++)
    {
        droplet_x_offset[i] = random_float() * 2.0f - 1.0f;
        droplet_rot_speed[i] = (random_float() + 0.5f) * ((i & 1) ? -3.0f : 3.0f);
        droplet_fall_speed[i] = random_float() + 0.2f;
    }

Now I have tried to convert it to Java, and mostly it is trivial:

    Random random = new Random();
    for (int i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
        dropletXSpeed[i] = random.nextFloat() * 2.0f - 1.0f;
        dropletRotSpeed[i] = (random.nextFloat() + 0.5f) * ((i & 1) ? -3.0f : 3.0f);
        dropletFallSpeed[i] = random.nextFloat() + 0.2f;
    }

Except that ((i & 1) ? -3.0f : 3.0) is not accepted by Java with the message:
incompatible types: int cannot be converted to boolean.

Can someone explain me what (i & 1) exactly does and how should it be replaced in Java?

share|improve this question
    
& is the bitwise and operator. – Alexis C. Jan 19 '14 at 12:33
    
@ZouZou I know what it is. But what is i & 1 doing? And @Downvoter, explain please. – skiwi Jan 19 '14 at 12:33
    
i & 1 wont return boolean 1 & 1 = 1 – praveen_mohan Jan 19 '14 at 12:36
    
It will give you the value (either 0 or 1) of the bit at position 0 of of i. If you take i = 2 (10 in binary), applying this mask will give (10 & 1) = 0 – Alexis C. Jan 19 '14 at 12:36
    
In c/c++ iguess if(1){} is valid but in java if(true){} is valid – praveen_mohan Jan 19 '14 at 12:37
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Unlike C/C++, in Java conditionals have to evaluate to a boolean.

For example:

int i = 1;
if (i) { ... }

isn't valid in java.

Your ternary would need to be:

(i & 1) != 0 ? -3.0f : 3.0f;
share|improve this answer
    
@peter.petrov No, you're right ... it's what I get for not writing C for 4 years. – Brian Roach Jan 19 '14 at 12:42
    
i & 1 is either 1 (if i odd) or 0 (if i is even). Right? ;) OK – peter.petrov Jan 19 '14 at 12:45
    
To be clear, I think my original would have been fine for this case but the proper equivalency with C evaluation is != 0. Non-zero values in C equate to true – Brian Roach Jan 19 '14 at 12:50

Using a trigraph is not as efficient as a formula for simple cases. This is because a branch miss is so expensive. You can do the same like this.

(3 - 6 * (i & 1))

This will be 3 if i is even and -3 if it is odd.

Note: as you have a loop there is an even simpler solution.

for (int i = 0; i < 256; i += 2) {
    dropletXSpeed[i] = random.nextFloat() * 2.0f - 1.0f;
    dropletXSpeed[i+1] = random.nextFloat() * 2.0f - 1.0f;
    dropletRotSpeed[i] = (random.nextFloat() + 0.5f) * 3.0f;
    dropletRotSpeed[i+1] = (random.nextFloat() + 0.5f) * -3.0f;
    dropletFallSpeed[i] = random.nextFloat() + 0.2f;
    dropletFallSpeed[i+1] = random.nextFloat() + 0.2f;
}

BTW nextFloat() is reasonably expensive. If you don't need 24-bit of randomness you can try something like this.

public float next8bitFloat() {
    return random.nextInt(256) * (1.0 / 256);
}
share|improve this answer

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