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I have a txt file with two columns:

1 2
3 4
5 6
7 8

I would like to read those numbers, calculate the mean and save the result into the third column in the same file. I opened my file for update "r+" but it seem not to work. Reading is fine but when I add the third column something wrong is happening with the file ... It seems that its being rewritten, theres no original content in it when I call my fun - after the first loop instruction. Any ideas?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void fun(const char *filename)
{
    double num1 = 0, num2 = 0, num3 = 0;
    FILE *f;
    if((f = fopen(filename, "r+")) == NULL)
    {
        exit(-1);
    }

    while(fscanf(f, "%lf %lf", &num1, &num2) != EOF)
    {
        //printf("num1 = %.2f, num2 = %.2f\n", num1, num2);
        num3 = num1 + num2;
        fprintf(f, "%lf %lf %lf\n", num1, num2, num3/2.0);
    }

    fclose(f);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    fun("numbers.txt");

    return 0;
}

When my program ends execution, I would like to have in my txt file 3 columns:

1 2 1.5
3 4 3.5
5 6 5.5
7 8 7.5

Tried also this but my program just hangs out:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void fun(const char *filename)
{
    double num1 = 0, num2 = 0, num3 = 0;\

    FILE *f;
    if((f = fopen(filename, "r+")) == NULL)
    {
        exit(-1);
    }

    int write_at = 0, read_at = 0;

    while(fscanf(f, "%lf %lf", &num1, &num2) != EOF)
    {
        read_at = ftell(f);
        fseek(f, write_at, SEEK_SET);
        num3 = num1 + num2;
        fprintf(f, "%lf %lf %lf\n", num1, num2, num3/2.0);
        write_at = ftell(f);
        fseek(f, read_at, SEEK_SET);
    }

    fclose(f);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    fun("numbers.txt");
    return 0;
 }
share|improve this question
    
"Something wrong is happening" is not a useful description... – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 19 '14 at 12:56
2  
It seems that you are reading and writing to the file [i]at the same time[/i]. Why not first read the data, store it and then finally write it? – rhughes Jan 19 '14 at 12:58
2  
What's probably happening is that you are overwriting parts of the file (you can't just add characters to a line like that, files are just raw binary data at the low level). Read the file into an array, compute the averages, then write the rows back to the file. – user529758 Jan 19 '14 at 12:58
    
@H2CO3: how about my second solution - are you able to help, why it does not work? – Brian Brown Jan 19 '14 at 13:04
    
@BrianBrown It doesn't work for the same reason. – user529758 Jan 19 '14 at 13:04

Open a temporary file and save the results there. Upon successful completion of reading the entire "numbers.txt" and writing the temp file, delete the original and rename the temp.

With file processing, this has the nice advantage that if the process fails in some fashion (IO error, data format error, etc.) the original is still intact. Fairly common with editors.

Another approach is to store the "new" file in memory and write it out at the end.

share|improve this answer

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