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While learning c I have implemented my own memcpy functions. I have used a wider type( uint32_t) in the function. (For simplicity the function is restricted to types that are multiples of 4 and the data is properly aligned )

void memcpy4( void* dst , void* src , int size )
{
    size /= 4;

    for ( int i = 0 ; i < size ; i++ )
        ((uint32_t*)dst)[i] = ((uint32_t*)src)[i];
}

I did some reading on type punning and strict aliasing and I believe the function above breaks the rule. The correct implementation would be this since you can use a char:

void memcpy4( void* dst , void* src , int size )
{
    for ( int i = 0 ; i < size ; i++ )
        ((char *)dst)[i] = ((char *)src)[i];
}

I tried to do some casting trough an union, but that turned out to be invalid as well.

How could such function be implemented with a wider type and not break the strict aliasing rule?

share|improve this question
8  
Since this is a learning exercise, let me suggest you another thing to learn: Never use signed ints for sizes and indices. Use unsigned ints, or better, std::size_t. This kind of implementation of memcpy() is the classic example of a signed int based attack. – Manu343726 Jan 19 '14 at 13:16
3  
Your implementation is using uint32_t. How big is a uint32_t? I don't know - I know what I might GUESS it would be, but I don't KNOW - and I absolutely don't know on any and all platforms. Try size /= sizeof(uint32_t). – Bob Jarvis Jan 19 '14 at 13:20
3  
A proper implementation has to deal with the fact that the pointers in question (both source and destination) may be unaligned relative to whatever boundaries may be important for a particular architecture. I know this is just an exercise, but I encourage you to sit down and handle all the edge conditions. That's how one learns. – Bob Jarvis Jan 19 '14 at 13:22
4  
sizeof(uint32_t) is usually 4, but it can be less than this on some platforms where CHAR_BIT > 8. – Paul R Jan 19 '14 at 13:23
4  
@self.: uint32_t is defined to be 32 bits, not 4 bytes. There's no requirement for a byte to be 8 bits, and there are plenty of platforms where it isn't. – Mike Seymour Jan 19 '14 at 13:48
up vote 13 down vote accepted

The way to implement memcpy using more than single-byte copies is to use non-standard C.

Standard C does not support implementing memcpy using other than character types.

Quality C implementations provide an optimized memcpy implementation that performs efficient copying using more than single-byte copies, but they use implementation-specific code to do so. They may do this by compiling the memcpy implementation with a switch such as -fnostrict-aliasing to tell the compiler the aliasing rules will be violated in the code, by relying on known features of the specific C implementation to ensure the code will work (if you write the compiler, you can design it so that your implementation of memcpy works), or by writing memcpy in assembly language.

Additionally, C implementations may optimize memcpy calls where they appear in source code, replacing them by direct instructions to perform the operation or by simply changing the internal semantics of the program. (E.g., if you copy a into b, the compiler might not perform a copy at all but might simply load from a where subsequent code accesses b.)

To implement your own specialized copy operation while violating aliasing rules, compile it with -fnostrict-aliasing, if you are using GCC or Clang. If you are using another compiler, check its documentation for an option to disable the aliasing rules. (Note: Apple’s GCC, which I use, disables strict aliasing by default and accepts -fstrict-aliasing but not -fnostrict-aliasing. I am presuming non-Apple GCC accepts -fnostrict-aliasing.)

If you are using a good C implementation, you may find that your four-byte-copy implementation of memcpy4 does not perform as well as the native memcpy, depending on circumstances.

share|improve this answer

In addition to assuming that sizeof(uint32_t) == 4, the line

size /= 4;

in your first implementation is simply wrong:

The division is an integer division, so it effectively computes floor(size/4). So if the original size is not divisible by four, between one and three bytes from source will not be copied to destination.

share|improve this answer
1  
The purpose of the question was to get some debate on the strict aliasing problem. Therefore the function is as simple as possible, making it limited to only certain types of input, which is explained in the text. Thus your comment is moot since the problem is in the aliasing of the data and not whether it is aligned or large enough or something else. The function could just as well be just a part of some larger piece of code, which would bring in more irrelevant problems while avoiding the main issue. – this Jan 19 '14 at 15:46
1  
@self: I didn't down-vote your question, I was just trying to point out a possible bug. Chill out. – EOF Jan 19 '14 at 17:00

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