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My website had nested queries that were storing results and ended up giving me problems as my code got larger. I am trying to learn how to join tables and do subqueries so I can streamline my code. This query returns the exact information I need, but my page load time went from 1 second to 9 seconds after adding this query. Is there some way to speed this up, or is there something I'm missing in it that is making it take so long?

SELECT p.product_id, 
       p.product_name, 
       p.product_pic, 
       AVG(r.review_stars), 
       COUNT(DISTINCT r.review_id), 
       (SELECT c.price_price FROM prices as c WHERE c.price_product=p.product_id ORDER BY c.price_price ASC LIMIT 1), 
       (SELECT c.price_vendor FROM prices as c WHERE c.price_product=p.product_id ORDER BY c.price_price ASC LIMIT 1) as VID, 
       p.product_url, 
       p.product_clicks, 
       SUM(c.price_clicks), 
       COUNT(c.price_price), 
       c.price_affiliate, 
       (SELECT v.vendor_name FROM vendors as v WHERE v.vendor_id=VID LIMIT 1) 
FROM products as p 
LEFT OUTER JOIN reviews as r ON p.product_id = r.review_product
LEFT OUTER JOIN prices as c ON c.price_product = p.product_id
GROUP BY p.product_id
ORDER BY p.product_clicks DESC
LIMIT 21
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post the table structures –  Sara Jan 19 at 15:27
    
This is slow because you use a lot of subqueries that are dependent on the main query. They are the 3 sub queries to get prices.price_price, prices.price_vendor, vendors.vendor_name. You can speed up the query by getting other information first then join the result set with prices and vendors to get out those bits of information. –  vidaica Jan 19 at 15:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can rewrite the query as the following to reduce the impact of subqueries:

SELECT

main_results.*,

(SELECT c.price_price FROM prices as c WHERE c.price_product=main_results.product_id ORDER BY c.price_price ASC LIMIT 1),
(SELECT c.price_vendor FROM prices as c WHERE c.price_product=main_results.product_id ORDER BY c.price_price ASC LIMIT 1) as VID,
(SELECT v.vendor_name FROM vendors as v WHERE v.vendor_id=VID LIMIT 1)

FROM

(

    SELECT p.product_id, 
           p.product_name, 
           p.product_pic, 
           AVG(r.review_stars), 
           COUNT(DISTINCT r.review_id),                 
           p.product_url, 
           p.product_clicks, 
           SUM(c.price_clicks), 
           COUNT(c.price_price), 
           c.price_affiliate               
    FROM products as p 
    LEFT OUTER JOIN reviews as r ON p.product_id = r.review_product
    LEFT OUTER JOIN prices as c ON c.price_product = p.product_id
    GROUP BY p.product_id
    ORDER BY p.product_clicks DESC
    LIMIT 21

) AS main_results
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You can possibly make it even faster that vidaica's code.

products would need INDEX(product_clicks, product_id); then see if this gives you the ids needed:

SELECT product_id FROM products ORDER BY product_clicks DESC LIMIT 21;

The replace this line:

FROM products as p

with

FROM ( SELECT product_id FROM products ORDER BY product_clicks DESC LIMIT 21 ) as ids JOIN products p ON p.product_id = ids.product_id

(There may be a few more tweaks needed, such as removing the outer LIMIT.)

The principle behind his suggestion is to whittle down the data to only 21 rows before doing the subqueries. I carried that one step further by also avoiding the JOINs until there are only 21. Furthermore, the INDEX I picked allows the scan to be done in the INDEX, rather than reaching into the table to find product_clicks.

See the EXPLAIN for "Using index".

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