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If I have this two vectors of pointers to MyClass

vector<MyClass*> A;
vector<MyClass*> B;

where A is full and B is empty and I do this operation:

B = A;

Have I to delete the pointers of both vectors or just one?

If I have a dynamic object like this:

MyClass *p = new MyClass;

And this pointer:

MyClass *p2;

If I do this operation:

p2 = p1;

Have I to delete both p and p2 or just one of two?

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"Have I to delete the pointers of both vectors or just one?" One at most, but probably none. Since you have not shown what these pointers point to, one cannot say for sure whether you have to delete anything at all. –  juanchopanza Jan 19 '14 at 19:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A pointer is just(*1) a regular variable containing an unsigned integer value. This value is an address in memory where the pointed-to-value is stored.

In simpler terms, you can think of a pointer as an array index to memory.

byte ram[16 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024]; // 16Gbs of memory.
size_t index = 10000; // indexes the 10,000th byte of ram.
byte* ptr = ram+ 10000; // ptr contains the same actual value as index
ptr = &ram[10000]; // same value again
ptr = ram;
ptr += 10000; // same value again

When you declare the variable as a pointer, you are extending it's contract within the language. Although, underneath, it is still just a regular variable, the language will treat your interactions with it differently because it is aware that you are expecting to use it to reference memory like this.

So, to answer your original question: You need to match every alloc with a single, corresponding delete. This is a concept called "ownership".

char* a = new char[64];
char* b = a;

Both a and b contain the same value, the address of our 64 bytes, but only one of them "owns" the allocation.

That determination is up to the programmer, and is deterministic: Which pointer will last longest? Which will try to use the pointer last?

char* a = new char[64];
if (a != nullptr)
{
    char* b = a;
    strcpy(b, "hello world");
    // <-- end of b's lifetime.
}
std::cout << a << '\n';

If we deleted b at the end of it's lifetime, a would still point to it. The actual underlying memory is untouched, the problem is that the memory could be allocated to someone else in the mean time. (You forget your watch in the drawer of a hotel. If you go back a week after your stay, will your watch still be in the top drawer?)

In the above example, clearly a is more authoritative for the allocation, so we should delete after a has finished using it.

char* a = new char[64];
if (a != nullptr)
{
    char* b = a;
    strcpy(b, "hello world");
    // <-- end of b's lifetime.
}
std::cout << a << '\n';
delete [] a; // we used new [] match with delete []

Pointer management can easily be difficult, and has been causing bugs in C code since C existed.

C++ provides several classes that encapsulate the properties of ownership. std::unique_ptr is a single point of ownership for allocations ideal for when you have a container of pointers.

std::vector<std::unique_ptr<YourClass>> myVector;
myVector.emplace_back(new YourClass));

when this vector goes out of scope, the unique_ptr objects will go out of scope, at which point they will delete their allocations. Problem solved.

There is also std::shared_ptr if you may need the ownership to be dynamic...

std::vector<std::shared_ptr<MailItem>> inbox;
std::set<std::shared_ptr<MailItem>> urgent;

// incoming mail goes into inbox, copied to urgent if its a priority...

for (auto it : inbox)
{
    if (it->>IsPriority()) {
        urgent.insert(it);
        // now there are TWO pointers to the same item.
    }
}

In the above case, the user can delete an urgent item from inbox but the item still exists. shared_ptr uses a "reference counter" to know how many pointers own the object. In most cases, this is going to be more complex than you need and unique_ptr will be sufficient.

(*1 There are some platforms where pointers are more than just a single variable but that's kind of advanced and you probably don't need to worry about that until such time as you work on such a platform)

share|improve this answer
    
"If we deleted b at the end of it's lifetime, a would still point to it. The actual underlying memory is untouched, the problem is that the memory could be allocated to someone else in the mean time." I don't understand. Deleting b means that the memory address contained in a can be used to someone else while a still exist? –  Maghio Jan 20 '14 at 14:48
    
When I delete b, a still exist. So finally I only need to delete a because it has been allocated trough new. Is it true? –  Maghio Jan 20 '14 at 14:52
    
Imagine this: You call the airline and book a flight to Paris. They tell you "Stroustrup airways, Flight 14, Seat 32b". You save this information to your phone for when you get to the airport. Then you also write it down on a piece of paper. You have TWO copies of the reservation. Then you call the airline and cancel the flight. Your two pieces of information, your two pointers, still have the same information in them. Does that make them valid? When you call "delete" on a pointer, you tell the operating system it can do what it wants with the memory. –  kfsone Jan 20 '14 at 21:42
    
new and delete are the equivalent of calling hotel reception and booking or checking out of a room. Room* myRoom = new Room; books a room for you. The manager looks through availability and assigns you a room not currently in use. When you call delete myRoom the room is not destroyed, nor does the manager erase your memory of which room you were in. delete is exactly like handing the keys over. You can still have 20-30 pointers to the room, the second you hand the keys over all of those pointers are invalid because you do not own the memory any more. –  kfsone Jan 20 '14 at 21:50
    
char* a = new char[64]; char* b = a; Deleting a or b is the same! I always tell to OS that the allocated memory for a can be used for someone else. In both cases the memory is untouched as long as it's used for another time. Did I understand? –  Maghio Jan 20 '14 at 23:03

The pointers are pointing to the same piece of memory, so you only need to delete it once.

You get undefined behaviour if you try to delete an object through a pointer more than once.

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Ok thank you. I also thought it but I have to make a project for an exam so I'm terrified! –  Maghio Jan 19 '14 at 19:43

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