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I've got some data on sales, say, and want to look at how different post codes compare: do some deliver more profitable business than others? So I'm grouping by postcode, and can easily get various stats out on a per postcode basis. However, there are a few very high value jobs which distort the stats, so what I'd like to do is ignore the outliers. For various reasons, what I'd like to do is define the outliers by group: so, for example, drop the rows in the dataframe that are in the top xth percentile of their group, or the top n in their group.

So if I've got the following data frame:

>>> df
Out[67]: 
     A         C         D
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055
1  bar  1.470956  1.350996
2  foo  1.981810  0.676978
3  bar -0.072829  0.417285
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740
6  foo  0.959957 -1.068385
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910

I'd like to be able to have some function, say drop_top_n(df, group_column, value_column, number_to_drop) where drop_top_n(df, "A", "C", 2) would return

     A         C         D
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910

Using filter drops whole groups, rather than parts of groups.

I could iterate through the groups, I suppose, and for each group find out which rows to drop, and then go back to the original dataframe and drop them, but that seems terribly clumsy. Is there a better way?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use apply() method:

import pandas as pd
import io


txt="""     A         C         D
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055
1  bar  1.470956  1.350996
2  foo  1.981810  0.676978
3  bar -0.072829  0.417285
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740
6  foo  0.959957 -1.068385
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910"""

df = pd.read_csv(io.BytesIO(txt), delim_whitespace=True, index_col=0)

def f(df):
    return df.sort("C").iloc[:-2]
df2 = df.groupby("A", group_keys=False).apply(f)
print df2

output:

     A         C         D
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055

If you want original order:

print df2.reindex(df.index[df.index.isin(df2.index)])

output:

    A         C         D
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910

to get rows above group mean:

def f(df):
    return df[df.C>df.C.mean()]
df3 = df.groupby("A", group_keys=False).apply(f)
print df3
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is what I wanted. apply() works separately on each group produced by groupby(). I hadn't realised that. – lpryor Jan 20 '14 at 10:30

In 0.13 you can use cumcount:

In [11]: df[df.sort('C').groupby('A').cumcount(ascending=False) >= 2]  # use .sort_index() to remove UserWarning
Out[11]: 
     A         C         D
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910

[4 rows x 3 columns]

It may make more sense to sort first:

In [21]: df = df.sort('C')

In [22]: df[df.groupby('A').cumcount(ascending=False) >= 2]
Out[22]: 
     A         C         D
4  foo -0.910537 -1.634047
7  foo -0.640706  2.635910
0  foo -0.536732  0.061055
5  bar -0.346749 -0.127740

[4 rows x 3 columns]
share|improve this answer
    
That's interesting, and addresses the specific example I gave very nicely. Is there a more general way of doing it, for example if I wanted to drop (or keep) only those rows that had a value above the group mean or mode? or that were within the top xth percentile? – lpryor Jan 19 '14 at 23:08
    
@lpryor you could do a groupy apply to return just those rows... – Andy Hayden Jan 20 '14 at 2:15

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