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I'm interested in knowing just how matplotlib processes the spectrogram. I understand most parts, specifically in the FFT and others, but, to me the scaling does not seem correct. The default is to return the PSD of the signal, however, I cannot seem to replicate it whatsoever. For example, in matplotlib I get this result:

enter image description here

However, when trying to replicate this (in C++) I get this result:

In C++ and plotted with matplotlib I get this result:

enter image description here

I'm mainly interested in how they somehow "remove" the noise factor to show the bins which have the most power in them. The graph I shove (above) in C++ I get similar results, yet, they are different.

Any help would be really appreciated.

std::vector<std::vector<Complex::complex> > ComputeSTFT(std::vector<double> 
&vals, std::size_t NFFT, std::size_t overlap)
{
   std::vector<std::vector<double> > temp_vars = frame(vals, NFFT, overlap);
   std::vector<std::vector<Complex::complex> > STFT(temp_vars.size());
   std::vector<double> hanning = getHanningWindow(256);

   for(unsigned i=0; (i < temp_vars.size()); i++)
   {
      for(unsigned j=0; (j < temp_vars[i].size()); j++)
      {
         double calculation = temp_vars[i][j] * hanning[j];
         calculation = (calculation == -0) ? 0 : calculation;
         temp_vars[i][j] = calculation;
      }
   }

std::vector<std::vector<Complex::complex> > fft_vars(temp_vars.size());
for(unsigned i=0; (i < temp_vars.size()); i++)
{
   fft_vars.resize(temp_vars[i].size());

   FFT f(temp_vars[i].begin(), temp_vars[i].end(), temp_vars[i].size());
   std::vector<Complex::complex> temp_fft = f.transformed();
   fft_vars[i] = temp_fft;
}

for(unsigned i=0; (i < temp_vars.size()); i++)
{
   STFT[i].resize(temp_vars[i].size()/2+1);
   for(unsigned j=0; (j < temp_vars[i].size()/2 + 1); j++)
   {   
       STFT[i][j].re = fft_vars[i][j].re;
       STFT[i][j].im = fft_vars[i][j].im;
    }
}

return STFT;
}



std::vector<double> CalculatePSD(std::vector<Complex::complex> &vals)
{
  std::vector<double> result(vals.size());

  for(unsigned i=0; (i < vals.size()); i++)
  {
    double mag = vals[i].re * vals[i].re + vals[i].im * vals[i].im;
    result[i] = mag;
  }
  std::vector<double> hanning = getHanningWindow(128);
  double sum = 0.0;

  for(unsigned i=0; (i < vals.size()); i++)
  {
     sum += abs(hanning[i]);
  }



for(unsigned i=0; (i < vals.size()); i++)
{
    result[i] = result[i] * 2/(12000)*sum;
    //result[i] /= sum;
    //result[i] *= 1;
}

return result;
}
share|improve this question
    
Are there any noverlap and window process in your C++ code? – HYRY Jan 20 '14 at 1:30
    
@HYRY - yes 128 overlap same as what's in matplotlib mhm think this could be the case? Also multiplying by hamming window (256) – Phorce Jan 20 '14 at 2:28
    
Then please theck the python code of pylab.specgram: github.com/matplotlib/matplotlib/blob/master/lib/matplotlib/… – HYRY Jan 20 '14 at 2:41
    
This also just got a major overhaul. – tcaswell Jan 20 '14 at 3:08
    
@HYRY that is what I have been doing...stackoverflow.com/questions/21211726/… please see here – Phorce Jan 20 '14 at 3:10

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