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With the table specified below, how could I modify the locking behavior in SQL Server 2012 to block statements and transactions attempting to select data pertaining to a specific UserId column?

I have been attempting to come up with a stored procedure that will successfully change an address for a specific user. In order to do this, the existing record is marked as deleted by setting DeletedOn to the current date. Afterward, the new record is inserted. I do not want any queries to be able to see that no valid address is present for the given user in the table between the deletion mark and the insertion.

Queries related to a different user's address should be able to complete, so long as that user's address is not in the process of being modified.

CREATE TABLE [Address]
(
    [Id] BIGINT NOT NULL,
    [UserId] FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES [User]([Id]) NOT NULL,
    [House] CHARACTER VARYING(255) NOT NULL,
    [Street] CHARACTER VARYING(255) NOT NULL,
    [City] CHARACTER VARYING (255) NOT NULL,
    [State] CHARACTER VARYING(255) NOT NULL,
    [Zip] CHARACTER VARYING(15) NOT NULL,
    [CreatedOn] DATETIMEOFFSET NOT NULL,
    [DeletedOn] DATETIMEOFFSET NULL,

    UNIQUE([UserId], [DeletedOn]),
    CHECK(([DeletedOn] IS NULL) OR ([CreatedOn] <= [DeletedOn])),

    PRIMARY KEY([Id])
);
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The fact you want to do this often indicates you are approaching the actual problem the wrong way. –  Mitch Wheat Jan 20 at 0:06
1  
@MitchWheat Could you elaborate? The environment is concurrent, the update that needs to be done is for a discrete subset of UserId and it should only affect those with that key. Other access to the table should not be blocked by that kind of an update. I want to wrap the logic behind my update in a stored procedure to prevent having to implement it in many different places. –  Michael J. Gray Jan 20 at 0:09
    
Playing around with this a bit more, it seems that the problem is stemming from the UNIQUE constraint creating a composite index on UserId and DeletedOn. When I try to update a range of keys by UserId it will exclusively lock the other access path via DeletedOn and thus any deleted or not deleted record in the same page even with different UserId. Some expert comment on locking behavior in SQL Server would be greatly appreciated. –  Michael J. Gray Jan 20 at 2:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using a history table solved this issue. It seems that UNIQUE constraints cause lots of lock escalations when they are defined as composites.

The history table now tracks all of the old versions of a particular record and history inserts are combined with live table updates in a repeatable read transaction.

What do you know, I was approaching the whole problem the wrong way!

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