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I would like to have a class's destructor execute only once, no matter how many times it's called during the execution of the script (some php version of the javascript event.stopPropagation()).

I have a scenario like so:

class A
{
    function __construct()
    {
        $b = new B();       // and do some stuff with B
        if ( condition )
        {
            $c = new C();   // and do some stuff with C
        }
    }
}

class B
{
    function __destruct()
    {
        echo "B: DESTRUCTOR!\n";
    }
    // …
}

class C extends B
{
    function __construct()
    {
        echo "C: CONSTRUCTOR!\n";
    }
    public function i()
    {
        echo "C->i()\n";
    }
}

$a = new A();

A is triggering B's destructor (because it creates an instance of B), and C might trigger B's destructor (because C extends B) if it is called from A. I need the last triggerer of B::__destruct() to be the only caller.

The reason for this is because B's destructor sets HTTP Response headers and then delivers the Response body; if the destructor is called more than once, PHP errors out because headers can't be sent after the body has started. I am in a shared-host situation so I cannot make configuration changes or install packages (like PECL's HttpResponse).

I am aware of headers_sent(), so I could add a test within B's destructor on the output of that, but I don't think that is the best solution.

share|improve this question
    
Destructors are there to tidy up an instance before it's deleted. PHP does most of this for you anyway so they're rarely very useful. If you need the class to actually do something, don't put it in the destructor. –  Mike W Jan 20 at 1:13
    
The reason I'm putting it in the destructor is so that it will be automatically called at the end (and then each child doesn't have to remember to call/execute the destructor's logic). –  jacob Jan 20 at 1:15
    
@jacob: What is it you want to do in the destructor? As Mike already said, destructors are rarely useful. –  halfdan Jan 20 at 1:17
    
@halfdan The destructor sends the response: It sets response headers and outputs the response body. –  jacob Jan 20 at 1:20
    
@halfdan, emphasis on automatically. –  jacob Jan 20 at 1:29
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1 Answer

function __destruct()
{
  static $runonce=false;
  if($runonce!==false)return;
  $runonce=true;
    echo "B: DESTRUCTOR!\n";
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, but as I mentioned in my question, I've already thought of this solution and am asking about a different one. –  jacob Jan 20 at 1:25
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