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I have a series of objects called Task with a field called startTime. I'm storing those objects in a linked-list sorted by startTime, and want to make it so that increasing startTime in one object will increase the startTime of all the objects that come after it. This is the basic logic I want iterated:

public void calculateStartTime(){
    if(startTime + duration > nextObject.getStartTime()){
        nextObject.setStartTime(startTime + duration);
        nextObject.calculateStartTime;
    }
}

How to I get Task to know its a node so calculateStartTime() can be contained within Task and reference the same prev and next that the Linked-List references?

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It almost feels like startTime is a global property of all instances of a Task. I'm thinking that it's a static field, but I don't believe that 100% reflects the logic you're trying to use to iterate over the collection. –  Makoto Jan 20 at 3:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

All you really need to make a "Linked List" is to have each Task contain a Task (The next one in the list). The problem is if you do it this way you can't take advantages of all the stuff built into Java Collections like sorting and iterators.

On the other hand, if you are keeping it in a traditional linked list, you have to be iterating over the list anyway to find the one you want so why not just continue iterating over the rest and calling calculate on each. You probably don't even need it to be a linked list, pass a Task into calculateStartTime and call it good.

I like what you are trying to do, but it might be more work than it's worth compared to the alternative.

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Thanks. I'm trying to keep the list capable of being optimally sorted for another bit, but I'm not sure I need it. I haven't fully worked out that algorithm contained in another section; the list is the only thing passed. I've decided to make a simple linked-list and try to insert in order instead of sort, as inserts are a lot fewer in this application than changes to 'startTime' . –  LMNOP Jan 20 at 5:19

To do exactly what you would like, you would have to create your own linked list with the Task object as the node. For example:

public class Task {
    Task previous, next;
    Date startTime;
    ...
}

In your calling method you would have a reference to the first Task and you could iterate over the list as you see fit. Doing so would allow you to conduct the logic that you have presented, however the downside of rolling your own linked list is that you lose the functionality of the built in LinkedList.

Please review whether a "helper" class might be beneficial to you with a method like:

calculateStartTime(ListIterator<E> remainderOfList) {
    while(remainderOfList.hasNext()) {
        E element = remainderOfList.next();
        element.calculateStartTime();
    }
}

The ListIterator can be generated from your LinkedList using the listIterator method

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if you want to do this without extending and creating you own LinkedList class try to pass the reference of LinkedList to the Task objects when they are created.

example Task class.

import java.util.LinkedList;
public class Task {
    int startTime;

    private LinkedList<Task> taskList;
    public Task(LinkedList<Task> taskList){
        this.taskList = taskList; 
    }

    public void calculateStartTime(){

        //your logic
        int duration = 10;

        //check if this task is the last element of the list
        if(taskList.size() > 0 && taskList.getLast() != this){

            int index = taskList.indexOf(this);
            Task nextObject = taskList.get(index + 1);
            if(startTime + duration > nextObject.getStartTime()){
                nextObject.setStartTime(startTime + duration);
                nextObject.calculateStartTime();
            }

        }

    }

    public int getStartTime(){
        return startTime;
    }

    public void setStartTime(int startTime){
        this.startTime = startTime;
    }


}
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I'll probably end up doing that, but I'd rather not use IndexOf. I'm mainly asking to get the speed benefit of having the nextNode directly referenced in Task. –  LMNOP Jan 20 at 4:45

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