Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I was wondering what is better to do, in terms of using good programming practice. I have a class, Account. It has one data memeber, m_balance. My question is, in my member functions, should i use m_balance directly, or the member function Account::get_balance(), when i need to use the account balance to compare or whatever.

For example....

int Account::get_balance() const
{
    return m_balance;
}

void Account::debit( int money_value )
{
    if( money_value > 0 && money_value <= m_balance )
        m_balance -= money_value;
    else if( money_value == 0 )
        throw std::invalid_argument( "Invalid debit value" );
    else if( money_value > m_balance )
        throw std::invalid_argument( "Debit amount exceeds account balance" );
}

Or should i define the member function...

void Account::debit( int money_value )
{
    if( money_value > 0 && money_value <= get_balance() )
        m_balance -= money_value;
    else if( money_value == 0 )
        throw std::invalid_argument( "Invalid debit value" );
    else if( money_value > get_balance() )
        throw std::invalid_argument( "Debit amount exceeds account balance" );
}

Is one practice any better than the other? Does calling the function take more time or anything?

If that makes sense. Sorry if its confusing. I don't quite know how else to explain it.

share|improve this question

closed as primarily opinion-based by Rapptz, Ryan Haining, Timothy Shields, Harry Johnston, Mark Parnell Mar 7 '14 at 0:27

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
You can put the implementation of "getBalance" in the class definition, and then the compiler is free to inline it. At that point, it is no more expensive than a direct access but has the advantage that if - in future - you need to make "getBalance" do something more complex, your users are already doing the right thing. – kfsone Jan 20 '14 at 5:28
    
yeah it is in the class definition... i just wrote it like that as an example... its a member function – anacy Jan 21 '14 at 0:29
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you put the implementation in a discrete compilation unit, then yes, there may be an overhead to accessing that element, since the program may have to perform a jump and return. However, it's also possible the compiler/linker can resolve this during "link time optimization".

You can also avoid this in the first place by providing an inline implementation of the getter:

class Account {
    double m_balance;
public:
...
    double getBalance() const { return m_balance; }
...
};

This is primarily about good encapsulation. When you do sloppy or partial encapsulation, you put a burden on your users to understand how the class works outside of simply accessing its members. For example, this is often the case when you return raw pointers -- the end user is now responsible for knowing whether, how and when to release the pointer value.

Plus getters are a good way of future-proofing things. Maybe in future you don't actively maintain "m_balance" or you need to add some thread-protection against accessing it. If your users are all directly accessing m_balance they'll just get bugs and weird behavior. If they are already going through getBalance they won't need to change anything.

share|improve this answer

getBalance assures the program that no outside user/caller can use m_balance's value nefariously (i.e. changing it, etc.). The idea of a "getter" insures that all the public use of that data member is "getting", not setting.

"Does it take more time?" Not at the cost of safety and good code. Pre-mature optimization is evil. Optimizations arise due to need more often than not. And if using a function to access the variable slows down your code, there's probably other ways to chop down on that complexity in run-time.

share|improve this answer
    
Right on, thank you – anacy Jan 20 '14 at 4:01
    
No problem! (Mark the question as answered if there's nothing else I can help with.) – Chris Zhang Jan 20 '14 at 4:02
    
how do you do that? – anacy Jan 20 '14 at 4:05
1  
Yes but the guy is using m_balance internally. I think using getter/setters internally is a matter that should be decided on a case-by-case basis. I think it is very helpful when getBalance() mean more than trivial return in the future and nonsense when it will likely never change to be more than a return. – Apprentice Queue Jan 20 '14 at 4:05
1  
From developer.android.com/training/articles/…, In native languages like C++ it's common practice to use getters (i = getCount()) instead of accessing the field directly (i = mCount). This is an excellent habit for C++ and is often practiced in other object oriented languages like C# and Java, because the compiler can usually inline the access, and if you need to restrict or debug field access you can add the code at any time. – Chris Zhang Jan 20 '14 at 4:14

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.