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No idea why this is not working. Here is the code:

if ((isset($_POST['cancel'])) && ($_POST['cancel'] == 'cancel'))
{
    header('Location: page1.php');
    echo $_POST['cancel'];
}

Instead of redirecting the page, this output's cancel to the webpage. It skipped over the redirect. Why? How can I fix this? page1.php is a real page located in the same folder as the current page. The above code is the very first lines of the php file. Nothing before it. Nothing. Not even whitespace.

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Don't echo anything afterwards; do an exit() to terminate the script. (You shouldn't output anything after having issued that header) –  Pekka 웃 Jan 20 '14 at 4:18
    
It's because you've already sent data to the browser in this context and therefore the headers have been sent. Turn on your error_reporting to get this answer in the future. –  Ohgodwhy Jan 20 '14 at 4:18
    
@Pekka웃 That isn't the source of the problem. You can echo anything you want afterwards... it just doesn't make any sense because the browser won't show it, so you're just wasting bytes. –  Brad Jan 20 '14 at 4:19
1  
@Pekka웃 using echo is fine, I doubt the condition isn't sufficed –  Mr. Alien Jan 20 '14 at 4:20
2  
@JohnS try this header('Location: ABSOLUTE_URL_HERE', true, 302); –  Mr. Alien Jan 20 '14 at 4:25

5 Answers 5

This is likely a problem generated by the headers being already sent.

Why

This occurs if you have echoed anything before deciding to redirect. If so, then the initial (default) headers have been sent and the new headers cannot replace something that's already in the output buffer getting ready to be sent to the browser.

Sometimes it's not even necessary to have echoed something yourself:

  • if an error is being outputted to the browser it's also considered content so the headers must be sent before the error information;
  • if one of your files is encoded in one format (let's say ISO-8859-1) and another is encoded in another (let's say UTF-8 with BOM) the incompatibility between the two encodings may result in a few characters being outputted;

Let's check

To test if this is the case you have to enable error reporting: error_reporting(E_ALL); and set the errors to be displayed ini_set('display_errors', TRUE); after which you will likely see a warning referring to the headers being already sent.

Let's fix

Fixing this kinds of errors:

  • writing your redirect logic somewhere in the code before anything is outputted;
  • using output buffers to trap any outgoing info and only release it at some point when you know all redirect attempts have been run;
  • Using a proper MVC framework they already solve it;

More

MVC solves it both functionally by ensuring that the logic is in the controller and the controller triggers the display/rendering of a view only at the end of the controllers. This means you can decide to do a redirect somewhere within the action but not withing the view.

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Use @obstart or try to use Java Script

put your obstart(); into your top of the page

if ((isset($_POST['cancel'])) && ($_POST['cancel'] == 'cancel'))
{
    header('Location: page1.php');
    exit();
}

If you use Javascript Use window.location.href

window.location.href example:

 if ((isset($_POST['cancel'])) && ($_POST['cancel'] == 'cancel'))
    {
        echo "<script type='text/javascript'>window.location.href = 'page1.php';</script>"
        exit();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
A header redirect will only send the HTTP headers specifying the new URL you have been redirected to. Using JS is a workaround -- it means having to receive/parse/run a page (HTTP headers + some content) and then the JavaScript will trigger a new request for which to receive/parse/run another page. –  Mihai Stancu Jan 20 '14 at 8:33

Try this, Add @ob_start() function in top of the page,

if ((isset($_POST['cancel'])) && ($_POST['cancel'] == 'cancel'))
{
    header('Location: page1.php');
    exit();
}
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I have experienced that kind of issue before and now I'm not using header('Location: pageExample.php'); anymore, instead I'm using javascript's document.location.

Change your:

header('Location: page1.php');

To something like this:

echo "<script type='text/javascript'> document.location = 'page1.php'; </script>";

And what is the purpose of echo $_POST['cancel']; by the way?, just delete that line if what you want is just the redirection. I've been using that <script> every time and it doesn't fail me. :-)

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up vote -1 down vote accepted

Pekka answered my question in the comments. He didn't post an answer, so I am now. Use the exit() method after the header redirect. For some reason the rest of the code of the page continues to execute after the header() method redirect. When the rest of the code executes, the echo statement is outputted to the page. And you can't redirect using the header function after you output to the page. To avoid rest of the code from executing, use exit(). Thanks Pekka.

UPDATE: When using the web browser Internet Explorer, I have noticed that $_POST['cancel'] is not reliable. I am not exactly sure why this is, but I suspect IE posts additional variables on a form submit, specifically the variable 'cancel' is posted. I solved this by using a variable name other than 'cancel'. The combination of using exit() and a unique variable name is working for me.

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