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I'm currently working on a Stroop Test for an institute of my university.

While measuring the time the user needs to hit the keys is no problem, I was curious what kind of delay exist when I call for example System.nanoTimes(). I wrote a small test

@Test
public void nanoTest()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        long t1 = System.nanoTime();
        long t2 = System.nanoTime();
        long t3 = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println("took: "+(t3-t1));
    }
}

which tells me:

took: 513
took: 0
took: 513
took: 513
took: 0
took: 0
took: 0
took: 0
took: 0
took: 514
took: 0
... etc.

There is no value other than 0, 513 or 514. If I replace long t2 = System.nanoTime(); with long t2 = System.currentTimeMillis(); it will print something like

took: 1540
took: 513
took: 513
took: 0
took: 0
took: 514
took: 514
took: 513
took: 513
took: 513
took: 514
... etc.

I assume that the first time we call System.currentTimeMillis() the function is not cached (I'm not sure how the JVM handles caching ...) therefore the delay is way bigger then the usual 0.5ms. I can just assume that this happens because the function is cached and frequently called. While I am fine with a delay between 0 and 0.5 ms for calling nanoTimes() I'm not fine with having 1.5ms or even more for calling the time function.

Can I tell the JVM or even my cpu to cache the specific time function? Can I tell the JVM to probably cache the whole programm? How can I achieve the smallest delay while measuring time?

I'm aware that those numbers can differ from pc to pc and even differ if I run more programms in the background, therefore I try to get the smallest delay possible for the time measuring.

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1  
I don't think there's something like function caching. I guess the JVM just cannot provide nanoseconds with desired granularity. If you have a look at the documentation docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/lang/… It also says that No guarantees are made about how frequently values change. It can also depend on your OS –  NeplatnyUdaj Jan 20 '14 at 12:28
    
It is more than likely System.out.println() that is causing a delay. System.nanoTime() can literally be called millions of times per second. The 513/514 you are printing is NANOSECONDS. I think ~500 nanosecond accuracy when measuring user response time is more than sufficient. –  brettw Jan 20 '14 at 12:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

System.nanoTime doesn't guarantee nano time accuracy: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/System.html#nanoTime%28%29
This method provides nanosecond precision, but not necessarily nanosecond accuracy. No guarantees are made about how frequently values change.

The fluctuation might simply be from factors like clock granularity, thread scheduling. Benchmarking such small intervals is hard to get accurate and normally not worth the effort.

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1  
A note on terminology: in Java 7 it changed to "This method provides nanosecond precision, but not necessarily nanosecond resolution (that is, how frequently the value changes)". They replaced accuracy with resolution, which is a somewhat more appropriate metrological term. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 20 '14 at 12:57

I'd suggest you consider chaining reaction tests to a point where you can take the average so that small glitches matter less. E.g. for measurements around 100ms I don't think +/- 0.5ms will matter.

However, if you really need that kind of precision, your tools (Java and standard computers, I guess) might be not be sufficient to begin with. Generally, you'll also have to account for aspects like input lag of peripherals and of course display lag (modern monitors still have at least 1-2ms afaik). Of course there are systems reaching sub-microsecond precision for real-world-interaction, but those are highly specialized and not widely available.

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Replace System.currentTimeMillis() with Clock.getRealtimeClock().currentTimeMillis().

The first time delay is not avoidable as it takes some time to load the functions into the stack itself. I believe there is no concept for method caching. Someone correct me if I am wrong.

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1  
Clock is not a JDK class. There will be such a class in the upcoming Java 8, but it will not have the getRealtimeClock() method. Anyway, what is the point of your suggestion? –  Marko Topolnik Jan 20 '14 at 12:34
1  
Okay I thought that is better accurate than the System.currentTimeMillis() in my recent reading; and even better accuracy when using for getting nanoseconds. Forgive me... Hmm.. And I believe that there is no option for method caching.. –  sivatumma Jan 20 '14 at 12:41
1  
Basically, Java has little or nothing to do with the resolution of currentTimeMillis and nanoTime---they are more or less transparently propagated from the corresponding OS calls. That is why there are no substantial guarantees for them. –  Marko Topolnik Jan 20 '14 at 12:55

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