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#include <iostream>

struct A
{
    A() { std::cout << "(A::A)"; }
};

struct B
{
    B() { std::cout << "(B::B)"; }
};

struct C
{
    template<typename ...Args>
    C(Args && ...) {}
};

int main(int agrc, char *argv[])
{
    C {A(), B()}; // <-- prints (B::B)(A::A)
    std::cout << std::endl;
    C {(A(), B())}; // <-- prints (A::A)(B::B)
    std::cout << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

I've got 2 questions:

  • Why in first braced init list objects are created in right-to-left order?
  • Why parentheses in second case revert this order?

Edit: I've compiled it with msvs 2013

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11  
Clearly to reproduce the problem. –  Puppy Jan 20 '14 at 12:43
    
@dyp Doesnt C {A(), B()}; // <-- prints (B::B)(A::A) contradict what you just said? –  Borgleader Jan 20 '14 at 12:44
    
I think the output of the first line shows a bug - according to 8.5.4/4, it should be evaluated left to right. –  jrok Jan 20 '14 at 12:45
    
@Borgleader I think I got it backwards :/ –  dyp Jan 20 '14 at 12:45
2  
@dyp. I don't think so. In list-initialization, every value computation and side effect of a given initializer clause is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with any initializer clause that follows it in the comma-separated list of the initializer list. –  sliser Jan 20 '14 at 12:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 21 down vote accepted

In the second instance, you're actually only initialising with B(); through the use of the comma operator, A() was constructed and thrown away first.

C {(A(), B())};
//|^^^^^^^^^^|
//      \--------> (A(), B())
//                  ^^^  ^^^
//                   |    |
//                   /    \
//            evaluated,   THEN evaluated,
//            discarded      used

On the other hand, in the first instance, you're initialising the C from both temporaries through an initializer list, whose elements should also be evaluated left-to-right, as it happens, but your compiler is buggy in this regard:

[C++11: 8.5.4/4]: Within the initializer-list of a braced-init-list, the initializer-clauses, including any that result from pack expansions (14.5.3), are evaluated in the order in which they appear. That is, every value computation and side effect associated with a given initializer-clause is sequenced before every value computation and side effect associated with any initializer-clause that follows it in the comma-separated list of the initializer-list. [ Note: This evaluation ordering holds regardless of the semantics of the initialization; for example, it applies when the elements of the initializer-list are interpreted as arguments of a constructor call, even though ordinarily there are no sequencing constraints on the arguments of a call. —end note ]

I can reproduce the problem with GCC 4.8*, but Clang 3.5 behaves properly. The bug has been discussed on the std-discussion list before, but I haven't found a GCC Bugzilla ID yet§.

C {A(), B()};
// ^^^  ^^^
//  |    \
// eval-  THEN
// uated   evaluated
//  \       /
//   \     /
//  both used

* http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/1f18e0d1f8973f3c
http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/5a6e7506e9be97c3
https://groups.google.com/a/isocpp.org/forum/#!topic/std-discussion/TQUnBFkUBDg
§ #51253 may be related.

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interesting drawing. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 20 '14 at 13:44
    
@GrijeshChauhan: Did you like it? –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 20 '14 at 13:45
    
Yes. I like ASCII arts, I also use a tool to draw :). btw congrats for 100K+, last time I saw you somewhere around 98k. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 20 '14 at 13:53
1  
@GrijeshChauhan: Time flies! –  Lightning Racis in Obrit Jan 20 '14 at 13:55
1  
#51253 is exactly this bug. See live example for gcc and clang, taken from the bug's testcase. –  iavr Apr 4 '14 at 23:12

Why in first braced init list objects are created in right-to-left order?

No. It is left-to-right. Your compiler has bug which is why it is evaluating right-to-left. GCC (4.8) is known to have this bug. Do you use GCC?

Why parentheses in second case revert this order?

Same. Left to right. In this case, comma operator comes into picture, which evaluates operands left-to-right.

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compiled with msvs 2013 –  sliser Jan 20 '14 at 12:47
1  
@sliser: then that too has bug (assuming what you said it true). –  Nawaz Jan 20 '14 at 12:48

It is an old bug of gcc 4.8.1 ( I suppose you use GCC) or of other compiler. I wrote about this bug several months ago the initializer-list: a bug of GCC 4.8.1

Though it is written in Russian but you can translate it into English using for example google service translate.

As it was said by others elements of the initializer-list are evaluated from left to right and all side effects are applied before evaluation of the next element.

In your second code example you in fact call the constructor with one expression that is an expression of the comma operator. The comma operator in fact behaves the same way as initializer-lists that is it evaluates its operands from left to right and applies side effects before evaluation of the next operand.

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