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Next step in my discovery of .net.

At the beginning I was using threads. After a discussion on another question (thanks ledbutter) I'm now using tasks.

So I have :

   private async void Tasks_Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        Task myTask = doSomething();
        await Task.WhenAll(myTask);
        Console.WriteLine("....");
    }
    private async Task doSomething()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Starting doSomething3");
        await Task.Delay(3000);
        Console.WriteLine("Finishing doSomething3");
    }

Now in my doSomething I want to use sockets to listen to a specified port. In my version with threads, I was doing :

Socket sock = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Dgram, ProtocolType.Udp);
IPEndPoint iep = new IPEndPoint(IPAddress.Any, 5000);
sock.Bind(iep);
EndPoint ep = (EndPoint)iep;
Console.WriteLine("Ready to receive...");
byte[] data = new byte[1024];
int recv = sock.ReceiveFrom(data, ref ep);
string stringData = Encoding.ASCII.GetString(data, 0, recv);
Console.WriteLine("received: {0}  from: {1}", stringData, ep.ToString());
sock.Close();

But if put put this code in the doSomething method, the RreceiveForm block the ui thread and all other tasks.

How can I do ?

share|improve this question
    
Please show the full new code of the doSomething method. –  Justin Harvey Jan 20 '14 at 13:41
    
Here's an example of a TCP server which is thread-agnostic: stackoverflow.com/a/21018042/1768303 –  Noseratio Jan 20 '14 at 14:24
    
The full code is : you replace await Task.Delay(3000); by all the code in the next block. –  tweetysat Jan 20 '14 at 15:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your network code does not await anything, so it does not run asynchronously. Either use the asynchronous operations of the Socket class, e.g. await sock.ReceiveFromAsync(...);, or run the code as a Task, e.g. await Task.Run(()=>{/*your code here*/});

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, thanks. I tried with await Task.Run(()=>{waitPacket()}); and public void waitPacket(){ ... }. It's working. But in the Tasks_Button_Click, no matters if I put await Task.WhenAll(myTask); the Console.WriteLine("...."); only happens when the waitPacket is finished. I'd like to try the other method (ReceiveFromAsync) if I found examples. –  tweetysat Jan 20 '14 at 15:04
    
Note the Task.Run( version is just your thread version "pretttyfied" it still has the same problems with scaling. See the example that was linked to in your question stackoverflow.com/questions/21013751/… –  Scott Chamberlain Jan 20 '14 at 15:12
    
Ok,so using threads and Task.Run it is the same. The 'look' is different but the result is the same. It is right ? And indeed using this solution, it's impossible to update ui within the task. So what would be the solution ? –  tweetysat Jan 21 '14 at 7:07
    
Don't find examples with ReceiveFromAsync. –  tweetysat Jan 21 '14 at 7:39

Use ReceiveFromAsync and do all the usual await stuff like you already did in the rest of the code. You can't call blocking APIs on the UI thread without freezing the UI. This requires a little care.

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