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I am using background subtraction for detecting moving vehicles in OpenCV.
The moving object is detected and a rectangle is created around the detected object. I input the video having moving objects in it.

The issue is :
I don't know how to calculate the moving object speed. I tried searching over forums, Google, StackOverflow but didn't got any idea on how to calculate the speed.

I want to implement the same as it is implemented in this YouTube video

Here is my code:

BgDetection.cpp

#include "BgDetection.h"
int BgDetection1();
using namespace cv;

int BgDetection1()
{
    cv::Mat frame;
    cv::Mat back;
    cv::Mat fore;
    CvSeq* seq;
    cv::VideoCapture cap("D:/Eclipse/bglib/video2.avi");
    cap >> frame;
    cv::initModule_video();
    cv::BackgroundSubtractorMOG2 bg(100, 16, true); // history is an int, distance_threshold is an int (usually set to 16), shadow_detection is a bool
    bg.set("nmixtures", 3);
    bg(frame, fore, -1); //learning_rate = -1 here
    std::vector<std::vector<cv::Point> > contours;
    cv::namedWindow("Frame");
    cv::namedWindow("Background");

    for(;;)
    {
        cap >> frame;
        bg.operator ()(frame,fore);
        bg.getBackgroundImage(back);
        cv::erode(fore,fore,cv::Mat());
        cv::dilate(fore,fore,cv::Mat());
        std::vector<cv::Vec4i> hierarchy;

        cv::findContours( fore, contours, hierarchy, CV_RETR_EXTERNAL, CV_CHAIN_APPROX_NONE);
CV_RETR_EXTERNAL, CV_CHAIN_APPROX_NONE, cvPoint(600,200));

        for ( size_t i=0; i<contours.size(); ++i )
        {
            cv::drawContours( frame, contours, i, Scalar(200,0,0), 1, 8, hierarchy, 0, Point() );
            cv::Rect brect = cv::boundingRect(contours[i]);
            cv::rectangle(frame, brect, Scalar(255,0,0));
        }
        //cv::drawContours(frame,contours,-1,cv::Scalar(0,0,255),2);
        cv::imshow("Frame",frame);
        cv::imshow("Background",back);
        if(cv::waitKey(30) >= 0) break;
    }
    return 0;
}

BgDetection.h

#ifndef BGDETECTION_H_INCLUDED
#define BGDETECTION_H_INCLUDED

#include <iostream>
#include <sys/stat.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <opencv/cv.h>
#include "opencv2/features2d/features2d.hpp"
#include <opencv/highgui.h>
#include "opencv2/opencv.hpp"
#include "opencv2/core/core.hpp"
#include "opencv2/nonfree/features2d.hpp"
#include "opencv2/highgui/highgui.hpp"
#include "opencv2/calib3d/calib3d.hpp"
#include  <vector>
#pragma comment (lib , "opencv_core244d.lib")
#pragma comment (lib ,"opencv_highgui244d.lib")
#pragma comment(lib , "opencv_imgproc244d.lib")
#pragma comment(lib ,"opencv_video244.lib")

int BgDetection1();

#endif // BGDETECTION_H_INCLUDED

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "BgDetection.h"

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << BgDetection1() << endl;
    return 0;
}

Any help appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
I removed the java tag since your code is c++. –  Adri C.S. Jan 20 at 13:53
    
no problem. thanks. –  user3214779 Jan 20 at 13:54
    
if you want to compute the speed in real world measurement, you need the relationship between pixel measures and real world measures: camera calibration to obtain the intrinsic camera parameters! And information about the street plane (in image and in real world). In addition you need to know the duration of time between the object movement. Rest is just easiest physics/mathematics: velocity = distance/time –  Micka Jan 20 at 17:15

1 Answer 1

Single object

If you are tracking a single rectangle around your moving object, the rectangle has a unique centre in each frame.

The difference between the centre positions could potentially be used to generate instantaneous velocity vectors.

My memory of opencv syntax in c++ is a bit rusty, but something along the lines of

// outside t-loop
cap >> frame;
bg.operator ()(frame,fore);
bg.getBackgroundImage(back);
cv::erode(fore,fore,cv::Mat());
cv::dilate(fore,fore,cv::Mat());
std::vector<cv::Vec4i> hierarchy;
cv::findContours( fore, contours, hierarchy, CV_RETR_EXTERNAL, CV_CHAIN_APPROX_NONE);
int i =0;
cv::drawContours( frame, contours, i, Scalar(200,0,0), 1, 8, hierarchy, 0, Point() );
cv::Rect rectold = cv::boundingRect(contours[i]);
cv::rectangle(frame, rectold, Scalar(255,0,0));

//cv::drawContours(frame,contours,-1,cv::Scalar(0,0,255),2);
cv::imshow("Frame",frame);
cv::imshow("Background",back);
if(cv::waitKey(30) >= 0) break;


    // Within t-loop
    cv::Rect newrect = cv::boundingRect(contours[i]);
    double vx = newrect.x - oldrect.x;
    double vy = newrect.y - oldrect.y;
    oldrect = newrect;

Multiple object

If you have multiple objects, you could generate a point list for the objects in frame t and t+1 and then do point set matching on the two point sets.

Depending on the tracking complexity I'd suggest

  • a simple nearest neighbour matching if the assignment is essentially trivial
  • Global nearest neighbours (e.g. Jonkers-Volgenant http://www.assignmentproblems.com/LAPJV.htm) for something more difficult
  • If that still doesn't work you'll probably have to delve into state estimation (see the Kalman filter for a basic example) and devise a cost function before calling LAPJV.
share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain in more brief, please. –  user3214779 Jan 20 at 13:58
    
I got an error while building- too few arguments to function 'cv::Rect cv::boundingRect(cv::InputArray) –  user3214779 Jan 20 at 14:06
    
Yeah this wasn't working code, it was meant more as an outline of ideas... so run what you have in your time-loop for t=0 and assign the oldrect from there, before going on to the "within t-loop section" –  jmetz Jan 20 at 14:10
    
I've updated the rectold initialization to something that fits with your current code. –  jmetz Jan 20 at 14:14
    
then how to calculate time differences to compute speed of object? –  user3214779 Jan 20 at 14:16

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