Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

i have a simple Javascript "class" im testing right now. I noticed that "this" in my private functions do not point to the object itself, instead, its pointing to the global scope (window).

Why?

Info: i want to keep mode private, so i used var mode instead of this.mode. I also want to keep both internal functions private, so user has no access to it. I basically use .prototype to add public functions to myStorage accessing private members with this.

My code:

var myStorage = function(mymode) {
    var mode = mymode;
    function privateFunctionA() {
      // access this.mode to read mymode from constructor but 
      // this is pointing to window
    };

    function privateFunctionB() {
      // access this.mode to read mymode from constructor but 
      // this is pointing to window
    };

    // check for indexeddb, websql and localstorage
    if(mymode == 'A') {
      privateFunctionA();
    } else {
      privateFunctionB();
    }
};
myStorage.prototype.publicFunc = function() {
  console.log(this.mode); // does this work?
}

var data = new myStorage();
share|improve this question
    
The this context does have nothing to do with scope, it would point to the object whose properties you can access. mode however is a local variable - private to the constructor. So NO - you cannot access it from the prototype function. –  Bergi Jan 20 at 18:03
    
this references the owner object of a function that is currently executing. Strictly speaking in this case it's the prototype object and not myStorage. –  Nobu Games Jan 20 at 18:04
add comment

marked as duplicate by Bergi, Frédéric Hamidi, Felix Kling, Louis, Dimitri M Mar 8 at 13:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

this is always function scoped in JavaScript (unless you pass in a context explicitly using call() or apply(). Therefore, in your private functions, this no longer refers to the same this as in the parent scope. An idiomatic way of handling this in JavaScript is to assign this to a self var in the parent scope. E.g.,

var myStorage = function(mymode) {
    var self = this;
    var mode = mymode;
    function privateFunctionA() {
        console.log(self);
    };
    ...
};

Regarding this snippet:

myStorage.prototype.publicFunc = function() {
    console.log(this.mode); // does this work?
}

You will need to assign mode to this back in your constructor (instead of as a var). So, the constructor would now become:

var myStorage = function(mymode) {
    var self = this;
    this.mode = mymode;
    function privateFunctionA() {
        // works
        console.log(self.mode);
    };
    ...
};

And this.mode will also work in your .publicFunc() in this case.

As one more stylistic note, constructor functions in JavaScript usually use proper camel case (i.e., MyStorage).

share|improve this answer
    
+1, You might also want to note that the private functions can access the local variables (mymode, var mode) –  Bergi Jan 20 at 18:08
    
Sounds good, but there is no way to keep this.mode or var mode private so the object user does not see it? –  NovumCoder Jan 21 at 7:15
    
strange, how do i call my private function from my public prototyped function? self.privateFunctionA and this.privateFunctionA does not work. –  NovumCoder Jan 21 at 7:26
    
ok i had to move my prototyping inside the myStorage function instead of heaving it outside, then i called my private functions with privateFunctionA.call(this, data).... –  NovumCoder Jan 21 at 7:52
add comment

I dont think you can access the object itself with this when using prototype, because the scope changes and you loose the reference to the primary object itself, so this becomes the window instead.

Check this other question in order to get some more info:

Use of 'prototype' vs. 'this' in Javascript?

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Scope never changes. Context (this) does change, but is correct when called as data.publicFunc(). –  Bergi Jan 20 at 18:06
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.