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I recently had to fix a bug that manifested sometimes in Internet Explorer. The bug was that, sometimes, the parser choked on code like

<script type="text/javascript">
 <!-- // comments -->
/*...*/
</script>

Which we fixed by correcting the comment. My question is: is "<!--" valid javascript code, or not? I tried testing it with firebug, and it only says" Undefined". JSFiddle didn't faze. IE only choked on it some of the times (reloading the page in question would show up the result of the script involved).

While knowing that, for historical reasons, an HTML comment inside js could be valid depending on its exact position and the phase of the moon is indeed useful, I was more interested in answers like "var <!-- foo is valid js code, but <!-- on its own is not. Here's why:..."

I did some analysis in firebug:

var x = 2;
var y = 3;
var z = 0;
console.log(x);
console.log(y);

y<!--x;
console.log(x);
console.log(y);

z = y<! --x;
console.log(x);
console.log(y);
console.log(z);

resulting in the following:

2
3
2
3
1
3
false

The difference between the first and second tries is interesting.

I then tried

z = (y <!--x);
console.log(z);

Which failed with

SyntaxError: missing ) in parenthetical
share|improve this question
    
foo <!--bar is valid. :D –  cookie monster Jan 20 '14 at 19:21
    
It might be because of the extra space before the HTML comment, if it is not a typo. Some Javascript parsers may only ignore HTML comments right at the beginnning of a script. –  Frédéric Hamidi Jan 20 '14 at 19:22
1  
@cookiemonster ReferenceError: foo is not defined –  Izkata Jan 20 '14 at 19:25
    
Of course. That doesn't mean it isn't valid JavaScript. It just means you didn't define foo, and probably not bar either. –  cookie monster Jan 20 '14 at 19:42
1  
@MackieeE, As stated, I was looking forward to an examination of <!-- as js code, not as relic. I think it's a different question. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 20 '14 at 19:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not.

If you go to the standard, you'll see that a < can only exist in a RelationalExpression, which <!-- is not as it hasn't got anything on the left-hand side.

share|improve this answer

First to answer your question on Is <!-- valid JavaScript: No, it is not, in none of the forms you gave in your question. This is because it is not valid according to the JavaScript BNF grammar which you can find here: http://tomcopeland.blogs.com/EcmaScript.html

If you are interested, here's why you do see it inside script blocks: It is the HTML comment character. You do see it very often within script tags like this:

<script>
<!-- 

.. JavaScript code...

// -->
</script> 

The reason is that old browsers (and with "old" I mean "stone age" like Netscape 1.0) that do not even support JavaScript and would otherwise just show the code on the screen. By doing it this way those older browsers treat the JavaScript as HTML comments and do not show it. Newer browsers ignore this and just run the JavaScript.

This is how it actually works (from http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/interact/scripts.html#h-18.3.2): The JavaScript engine allows the string <!-- to occur at the start of a SCRIPT element, and ignores further characters until the end of the line. JavaScript interprets // as starting a comment extending to the end of the current line. This is needed to hide the string --> from the JavaScript parser.

Because all browsers nowadays support JavaScript (even if it is turned off) you do not need to do this anymore. It is actually bad practice to do so because of these reasons (from http://www.javascripttoolbox.com/bestpractices/#comments):

  • Within XHTML documents, the source will actually be hidden from all browsers and rendered useless
  • -- is not allowed within HTML comments, so any decrement operations in script are invalid

An even deeper explanation and all the cons and pro's can be found here: http://lachy.id.au/log/2005/05/script-comments

share|improve this answer
    
I know it is an HTML comment starter, yes. Still, <, !, -- are valid js operators. I want to know if perchance the combination is somewhat valid, or exactly why not, in Javascript. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 20 '14 at 19:19
3  
@AdrianoVaroliPiazza: It's not valid because there is no operand before <. var x = 10; 5<!(--x) would be valid though. It also depends depends on the context. Inside a script tag, the <!-- sequence would always indicate a HTML comment and you you would get syntax errors. If the code is in it's own file, this doesn't have to be the case. –  Felix Kling Jan 20 '14 at 19:20
1  
Two things: this is new code, and the times I've seen similar code was with the HTML comment preceded by //, I think. –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 20 '14 at 19:24
1  
@AdrianoVaroliPiazza: Actually, outside of an HTML context (e.g. the console), 5 <!--x is valid as well, but it returns 5 and x is still 10 which somehow indicates that something weird is going there. In any case, <!-- alone is invalid because it misses operands. –  Felix Kling Jan 20 '14 at 19:28
    
@Adriano, actually the JS comment was before the closing tag of the HTML comment: <!-- ... //-->. That's because script parsers only ignore the start tag of the comment, the end tag still has to be special-cased. –  Frédéric Hamidi Jan 20 '14 at 19:45

In older browsers, it was required to have these comments inserted because the browsers couldn't parse the javascript properly. it would try to literally parse the javascript as html which caused script execution failures.

Today, browsers don't need this.

share|improve this answer

Comments in Javascript are like other C-type languages (// for single line, /* */ for blocks.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 This doesn't really answer my question –  Adriano Varoli Piazza Jan 20 '14 at 19:22
    
Let me try again then, but it's clearly been answered by this point. Expression wise it is not valid javascript, but it is ignored by a lot of interpreters today due to it's previous (hacked) usage as described above. < is a numeric comparison operator, ! is the 'not' operator, and -- is an arithmetic operator. If I were to theorize, if this hack was never used and thus ignored by parsers today, just writing <!-- in javascript would cause a syntax or operator error... –  Dan H Jan 20 '14 at 19:40

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