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Is there any way to simulate Multiple Inheritance in C#? I know there isn't so I need help finding a way around.

So I have a project, and it has classes, and one type of these classes is responsible for providing a comparison functionality to a manager. So naturally the functionality is an Interface.

interface StringCompareString
{
    string getName();

    ErrorState compare_two_strings(string[] inputs, ref double[] similarities);
    ErrorState compare_two_strings(string input1, string input2, ref double similarity);
}

now here is the deal, there are two variations to the comparison function, one of them gets a bunch of strings, and is supposed to to compare them all somehow to each other, and the other receives just two strings, and is supposed to compare just these two. However I want the implementors (people in my group who don't do management code) to receive a default compare_two_strings of the first viriaty.

namely this function

Note: the only thing that is important in the functions itself is that this function must reference the simple version of compare_two_strings.

ErrorState compare_two_strings(string[] inputs, ref double[] similarities)
{
    similarities = new double[inputs.Count() * (inputs.Count() - 1) / 2];

    int count = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < inputs.Count(); ++i)
    {
        for (int j = i + 1; j < inputs.Count(); ++j)
        {
            double finality = -1;
            compare_two_strings(inputs[i], inputs[j], ref finality);
            similarities[count] = finality;
            ++count;
        }
    }
}

The problem is that I want to define this function at Interface level. And then other classes who : Inherit this Interface to have this function definition as a default implementation. And these classes already used up their one time ticket of Inheriting. And c# doesn't allow for any function definition in the Interface, or Multiple Inheritance. What to do, what to do?

The ugly approach would be to copy paste that function implementation into every single one of those classes, which is very bad design.

Ok thank you all for propositions, I learned a lot of new buzz words at the very very least. In the end the decision was to use composition but not on the Interface. I'll use composition on the classes that StringCompareString already inherits from, which would free up the Inheritance for an abstract class instead of the Interface.

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4  
Composition.... –  Peter Ritchie Jan 20 at 21:11
10  
"C# OOP Limitations for Interfaces is killing my project" --- you would never say that. It's your app design kills itself. –  zerkms Jan 20 at 21:12
1  
Multiple inheritance is a smell for a design problem –  Snoopy Jan 20 at 21:20
4  
20,000+ lines and 50 classes is nothing... Code can always be refactored (and should be). Don't blame the language just because you don't know how to use it. –  Dave Zych Jan 20 at 21:27
1  
Have you looked into extension methods? –  miniBill Jan 20 at 22:31

3 Answers 3

If you are going to have implementors that are only actually intending to implement one of the two methods then you shouldn't have them together in the same interface.

Create two interfaces, one for each method; this way if someone wants to provide an implementation of just one of the two methods they can do so.

Provide two types, one for each interface, that has a "Default" implementation of that interface. It might make sense for this type to be a Singleton. It wouldn't need to be, but it's worth considering.

A consumer can use just one of the interfaces if it only needs one of the methods; it it needs both methods then it can simply accept two objects. It could happen to be a single instance that implements both interfaces, it could be a copy of the default type and one of a custom type, two different custom types, or whatever.

If it's important to pass around some single instance of something that can do all of these things (either by necessity, for interoping with some library, or just for convenience, if consumers will always need all of these things) then create interfaces just for the individual methods, leave this composite interface, and then create a class that implements the "big" interface will all of the methods, takes objects representing each of the "smaller" interfaces, and then just dispatches all of the relevant method calls to the composed object.

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I'm not sure I understood you, in fact I'm sure I didn't but two interfaces does seem likely –  user3167049 Jan 20 at 21:51
    
@user3167049 What don't you understand, in particular? –  Servy Jan 20 at 21:54

What you'd usually do in this case is to use dependency injection.

Say, you have a class StringCompareString that provides only the string comparison functionality:

public sealed class StringCompareString
{
    public ErrorState Compare(string[] inputs, ref double[] similarities)
    {
        // Implementation here...
    }

    public ErrorState Compare(string input1, string input2, ref double similarity)
    {
        // Implementation here...
    }
}

And you have a class MyClass that wants to compare strings. Then you provide the StringCompareString to the class through its constructor. For example:

public class MyClass
{
    private StringCompareString comparer;

    public MyClass(StringCompareString comparer)
    {
        if (comparer == null) throw new ArgumentNullException();

        this.comparer = comparer;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
        // Some code that uses the comparer:
        this.comparer.Compare("String 1", "String 2", ...);
    }
}

Your MyClass now has a dependency on StringCompareString, and you've injected it through its constructor. You can easily swap the StringCompareString implementation with a different implementation. And any class only has to take a StringCompareString as a constructor argument to use it. No more code copying.

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How about instead of having everything inherit from this interface, you make the classes that require this functionality accept this functionality as a constructor parameter?

Example

public class Foo : FooBase
{
    //access StringCompareString functionality through this member instead
    //of some base class
    private readonly StringCompareString _comparer;

    public Foo(StringCompareString comparer)
    {
        _comparer = comparer;
    }

}
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