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class A{
public:
     A(): b(), c(), d(){}
private:
B b;
C c;
D d;
};

I have something similar to above code. where the initialization list is longer than here. Somewhere things go wrong in the initialization of objects. I want to find out where did it go wrong; after what object and in the initialization of which object did it fail.

I dont want to do it adding print statements to the respective classes.

One way I thought of having a class temp which will print a line for me in its constructor; This way I need to have as many objects as the number of class variables in my class A. There is no segfault or any exception being thrown which I can catch.

So is there any other way I can debug this other than having a class temp with as many objects of temp as the member variables. Is there smart way to debug this. Thanks.

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Have you tried using a debugger? –  FRob Jan 20 at 22:20
    
Is the order of the initialization list the same as the order in which the objects are declared in the class definition? And do any of those objects' constructors require another object to be passed to it? –  Praetorian Jan 20 at 22:22
    
Well, My program runs on a cluster so I cant attach the debugger since it occurs on one of the node. Yes the order of initialization is correct and none of the objects are passed to other classes which are uninitialized. But in any case if I want to print a statement after initialization of every object, is there a easy way to do it other than the one I mentioned. –  rkb Jan 20 at 22:27
    
Praetorian hinted at this. Initialization in a constructor is done in the order the member variables are defined in the class, and not in the order they are listed in the constructor initializer list. –  brian beuning Jan 20 at 22:54

1 Answer 1

#include <exception>
#include <string>
#include <typeinfo>
#include <iostream>

struct B
{
};
struct C
{
};
struct D
{
};
struct YourExceptionType:std::exception
{   std::string m_s;
    YourExceptionType(const std::string &_r)
        :m_s(_r)
    {
    }
    ~YourExceptionType(void) throw()
    {
    }
    const char *what(void) const throw()
    {   return m_s.c_str();
    }
};
struct Show
{   Show(const char *const _p)
    {    std::cout << _p << std::endl;
    }
};
template<typename A>
struct ShowMe:Show, A
{   ShowMe(void)
        try:Show(typeid(A).name()),
        A()
    {
    } catch (const std::exception &_r)
    {    throw YourExceptionType(
             (std::string("Failed constructor of type ") 
             + typeid(A).name()
             + ":" + _r.what()).c_str()); 
    }
};
class A{
    public:
    A(): b(), c(), d(){}
    private:
    ShowMe<B> b;
    ShowMe<C> c;
    ShowMe<D> d;
};
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