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How do you reverse a string in place in C or C++?

Ok, I'm learning C, and I'm trying to reverse a string in place using pointers. (I know you can use an array, this is more about learning about pointers.)

I keep getting segfaults when trying to run the code below. Gcc seems not to like the *end = *begin; line. Why is that?

especially since my code is nearly identical to the non-evil c fn already discussed


#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void my_strrev(char* begin){
    char temp;
    char* end;
    end = begin + strlen(begin)-1;

    while(end>begin){
        temp = *end;
        *end = *begin;
        *begin = temp;
        end--;
        begin++;
    } 
}

main(){
    char *string = "foobar";
    my_strrev(string);
    printf("%s", string);
}
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marked as duplicate by casperOne Aug 15 '12 at 17:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

7 Answers 7

up vote 12 down vote accepted

One problem lies with the parameter you pass to the function:

char *string = "foobar";

This is a static string allocated in the read-only portion. When you try to overwrite it with

*end = *begin;

you'll get the segfault.

Try with

char string[] = "foobar";

and you should notice a difference.

The key point is that in the first case the string exists in the read-only segment and just a pointer to it is used while in the second case an array of chars with the proper size is reserved on the stack and the static string (which always exists) is copied into it. After that you're free to modify the content of the array.

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Something like char *string = strdup( "foobar" ); would work. –  x4u Jan 23 '10 at 20:37
    
Thanks a lot Remo.D. That's it! –  brice Jan 23 '10 at 20:39
    
Now to read about Read-only memory... –  brice Jan 23 '10 at 20:41
    
@x4u. Yes but you should free the memory returned by strdup() when done. Not important in this case, I admit, but still I wouldn't suggest using strdup() unless it's the only sensible option. –  Remo.D Jan 23 '10 at 20:43
2  
Just to be perfectly clear, char *s = "blah" allocates storage for 5 characters somewhere that may or may not be read-only. In most cases the storage is in a read-only segment of memory alongside the machine code for the program instructions. On the other hand, char s[] = "blah"; allocates a modifiable array of 5 characters on the stack (i.e., local storage). This is always modifiable. Take a look at (stackoverflow.com/questions/2036096/…) for more details about literal strings. –  D.Shawley Jan 23 '10 at 20:53

In your code you have the following:

*end--;
*begin++;

It is only pure luck that this does the correct thing (actually, the reason is operator precedence). It looks like you intended the code to actually do

(*end)--;
(*begin)++;

Which is entirely wrong. The way you have it, the operations happen as

  • decrement end and then dereference it
  • increment begin and then dereference it

In both cases the dereference is superfluous and should be removed. You probably intended the behavior to be

end--;
begin++;

These are the things that drive a developer batty because they are so hard to track down.

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Thanks for catching that. Edited it out. –  brice Jan 23 '10 at 21:52

You can also utilize the null character at the end of a string in order to swap characters within a string, thereby avoiding the use of any extra space. Here is the code:

#include <stdio.h>

void reverse(char *str){    
    int length=0,i=0;

    while(str[i++]!='\0')
        length++;

    for(i=0;i<length/2;i++){
        str[length]=str[i];
        str[i]=str[length-i-1];
        str[length-i-1]=str[length];
    }

    str[length]='\0';
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

    reverse(argv[1]);

    return 0;
}
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Change char *string = "foobar"; to char string[] = "foobar";. The problem is that a char * points to read only memory which you then try to modify causing a segmentation fault.

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This would be in place and using pointers

 #include<stdio.h>
 #include<string.h>
 #include<stdlib.h>

 void reve(char *s)
 {
    for(char *end = s + (strlen(s) - 1); end > s ; --end, ++s)
    {
        (*s) ^= (*end);
        (*end) ^= (*s);
        (*s) ^= (*end);
    }
 }

int main(void)
{
    char *c = malloc(sizeof(char *) * 250);
    scanf("%s", c);
    reve(c);
    printf("\nReverse String %s", c);
}
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This makes for a small(ish) recursive function and works by storing the values on the way down the stack and incrementing the pointer to the start of the string (*s) on the way back up (return).

Clever looking code but awful in terms of stack usage.

#include <stdio.h>

char *reverse_r(char val, char *s, char *n)
{
    if (*n)
        s = reverse_r(*n, s, n+1);
   *s = val;
   return s+1;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *aString;

    if (argc < 2)
    {
        printf("Usage: RSIP <string>\n");
        return 0;
    }

    aString = argv[1];
    printf("String to reverse: %s\n", aString );

    reverse_r(*aString, aString, aString+1); 
    printf("Reversed String:   %s\n", aString );

    return 0;
}
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Here's my version of in place s c string reversal.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main (int argc, const char * argv[])
{

    char str[] = "foobar";
    printf("String:%s\n", str);
    int len = (int)strlen(str);
    printf("Lenth of str: %d\n" , len);
    int i = 0, j = len - 1;
    while(i < j){
        char temp = str[i];
        str[i] = str[j];
        str[j] = temp;
        i++;
        j--;
    }

    printf("Reverse of String:%s\n", str);
    return 0;
}
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