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When I read Effective C++, it says, never redefine a non-virtual function in C++.

However, when I tested it, the code below compiles correctly. So what's the point? It's a mistake or just a bad practice?

class A {

    public:
    void f() { cout<<"a.f()"<<endl;};   
};

class B: public A {
    public:
    void f() { cout<<"b.f()"<<endl;};   
};


int main(){

    B *b = new B();
    b->f(); 
    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Redefining a non-virtual function is fine so long as you aren't depending on virtual dispatch behavior.

The author of the book is afraid that you will pass your B* to a function that takes an A* and then be upset when the the result is a call to the base method, not the derived method.

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1  
Lovely answer! Short, to the point, and shows how emotional programming is. –  DarenW Jan 23 '10 at 21:41
    
I disagree, the author Scott Meyers points out that public inheritance establishes an invariant over specialization for class b. Furthermore, class usage is confusing when the behavior of f() behavior depends on the pointer definition not the object definition. Example: B x; A *ptr = &x; ptr->f() //calls the class A version of f() and not class B version of f() and that is confusing. –  CBO Dec 4 '13 at 4:13

Try this:

int main(){
    A *b = new B();
    b->f(); 
    return 0;
}

I think the answer will be obvious once you see the result ;-).

Without being virtual, the late-binding mechanism will not be used, hence the function that is defined for that pointer type will be used, not late-binded function that you want to call. This leads to tons of badly trackable bugs.

Hence, what you are doing is creating a new function. It may be what you intended, but someone reading your code afterwards might expect the above code to work with late-binding. Very confusing.

One of the features I really wanted to see is a warning in such a case, with a "redefine" keyword to prevent it, but dreams are dreams, and reality is reality -_-

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The point is that if you, for instance, have a list of pointers to the base class (List<A *> list) and then call f(), the re-implemented method in B will not be called.

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