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I wanted to check Integer equality in my application but came across a strange behavior. At some point my application was working correctly but at some point it was failing. So I just written a test code over here

public class EqualityTest {

     public static void main(String args[]) {
           Integer a = 100;
           Integer b = 100;
           Integer c = 1000;
           Integer d = 1000;
           if (a == b) {
                 System.out.println("a & b are Equal");
           }
           else {
                 System.out.println("a & b are Not Equal");
           }

           if (c == d) {
                 System.out.println("c & d are Equal");
           } else {
                 System.out.println("c & d are Not Equal");
           }
     }
}

Output

a & b are Equal
c & d are Not Equal

here my question is why c and d are not equal?

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marked as duplicate by Jigar Joshi, ling.s, devnull, Jon Skeet, Brian Roach Jan 21 at 6:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
lower value caching in Integer –  Jigar Joshi Jan 21 at 6:40
2  
    
oh! yes got the answer. I need to use equals. –  eatSleepCode Jan 21 at 6:43
    
also related answer from this –  Jonjongot Jan 21 at 6:50
    
upto 127 it show equal there after not equal –  Lijo Jan 21 at 6:50

4 Answers 4

Integer uses caching of small values in range of -128 to 127, and so you get same instance for small values such as 100.

For the values outside this range, a new Integer instance is created and returned.

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and the cached value is between -128 to 127.. Anything within this range, you get the same object (so 100 gives equal.) and anything outside this range, a new object is returned (2 new Integer objects with value 1000 .. So you get false..) –  TheLostMind Jan 21 at 6:46

Integer is mutable class and keep around -128 to 127 integers in cache. So == will work on Integers -128 <= i <= 127

Each time you create Integer with this range it will return you the same object previously created.

For Java 7 implementation could be achieved with system property:

-Djava.lang.Integer.IntegerCache.high=<size>
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Integer is an Object. You should use equal instead of == like

if(a.equal(b)){
...
}
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Doesnt answer the question.. OP already knows this... –  TheLostMind Jan 21 at 6:45
    
this is not in the complete answer: please address caching of small values. –  ljgw Jan 21 at 6:46
        Integer a = 100;
        Integer b = 100;
        Integer c = 1000;
        Integer d = 1000;
        if (a.equals(b)) {
            System.out.println("a & b are Equal");
        }
        else {
            System.out.println("a & b are Not Equal");
        }
        if (c.equals(d)) {
            System.out.println("c & d are Equal");
        } else {
            System.out.println("c & d are Not Equal");
        }

==means their pointer or reference equal,not value equal.You should call .equals method

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this is not in the complete answer: please address caching of small values. –  ljgw Jan 21 at 6:45

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