Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

numademo utility (is part of numactl package) is shipped with many popular linux distributions (RHEL, SLES, ...). I tried to find out any documentation related to this tool but I was not able to find any useful information. Either no one is using it or everyone using it know all about it.

Here's a sample output

2 nodes available

memory with no policy memcpy              Avg 10415.77 MB/s Max 10427.37 MB/s Min 10377.83 MB/s
local memory memcpy                       Avg 9499.52 MB/s Max 10423.22 MB/s Min 7239.55 MB/s
memory interleaved on all nodes memcpy    Avg 7355.64 MB/s Max 7657.19 MB/s Min 6284.92 MB/s
memory on node 0 memcpy                   Avg 5837.94 MB/s Max 6073.07 MB/s Min 5067.05 MB/s
memory on node 1 memcpy                   Avg 10285.20 MB/s Max 10425.29 MB/s Min 9206.11 MB/s
memory interleaved on 0 1 memcpy          Avg 7513.01 MB/s Max 7658.31 MB/s Min 6440.88 MB/s

setting preferred node to 0
memory without policy memcpy              Avg 6071.17 MB/s Max 6073.07 MB/s Min 6069.55 MB/s

setting preferred node to 1
memory without policy memcpy              Avg 9126.62 MB/s Max 10427.37 MB/s Min 7236.55 MB/s
manual interleaving to all nodes memcpy   Avg 7357.19 MB/s Max 7656.07 MB/s Min 6439.30 MB/s
manual interleaving on node 0/1 memcpy    Avg 7512.90 MB/s Max 7658.31 MB/s Min 6439.30 MB/s

current interleave node 1
running on node 0, preferred node 0
local memory memcpy                       Avg 10086.53 MB/s Max 10423.22 MB/s Min 8943.84 MB/s
memory interleaved on all nodes memcpy    Avg 6451.66 MB/s Max 6454.36 MB/s Min 6448.01 MB/s
memory interleaved on node 0/1 memcpy     Avg 5199.00 MB/s Max 5200.24 MB/s Min 5196.63 MB/s
alloc on node 1 memcpy                    Avg 5068.47 MB/s Max 5069.99 MB/s Min 5067.05 MB/s
local allocation memcpy                   Avg 10248.81 MB/s Max 10421.15 MB/s Min 8933.17 MB/s

setting wrong preferred node memcpy       Avg 6070.75 MB/s Max 6072.37 MB/s Min 6067.45 MB/s
setting correct preferred node memcpy     Avg 10418.04 MB/s Max 10423.22 MB/s Min 10408.74 MB/s

running on node 1, preferred node 0
local memory memcpy                       Avg 10417.63 MB/s Max 10423.22 MB/s Min 10400.48 MB/s
memory interleaved on all nodes memcpy    Avg 7653.39 MB/s Max 7660.55 MB/s Min 7641.57 MB/s
memory interleaved on node 0/1 memcpy     Avg 6949.18 MB/s Max 7658.31 MB/s Min 5201.27 MB/s
alloc on node 0 memcpy                    Avg 5952.14 MB/s Max 6073.77 MB/s Min 5065.10 MB/s
local allocation memcpy                   Avg 10419.28 MB/s Max 10425.29 MB/s Min 10402.54 MB/s

setting wrong preferred node memcpy       Avg 6069.06 MB/s Max 6073.07 MB/s Min 6059.03 MB/s
setting correct preferred node memcpy     Avg 10248.81 MB/s Max 10423.22 MB/s Min 8946.89 MB/s

I need to know how these tests are carried out ?

how to interpret these results ?

eg: what can cause following numbers to differ drastically.

memory on node 0 memcpy                   Avg 5837.94 MB/s
memory on node 1 memcpy                   Avg 10285.20 MB/s

Thanks, Harshana

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The test is pretty self-explanatory. It uses the functions in libnuma to allocate memory on different NUMA nodes and measure the time it takes to do operation on it. For example, it appears that your program is running initially on a CPU core from the second NUMA domain, therefore accessing memory on node 0 is almost twice as slower. The access speed to interleaved memory is usually the average of the access speeds of both domains since pages are distributed in a round-robin fashion.

setting preferred node to 0 means that the program is telling the OS to give preference on allocating memory on node 0. The following test confirms that this policy is working as the speed is still slow (as the program still runs on node 1).

setting preferred node to 1 tells the OS to allocate memory preferably on node 1. The speeds are thus higher as this one is local to the executing program.

running on node 0, preferred node 0 - the program moves itself to node 0 (libnuma also supports CPU binding as well as memory binding) and sets the memory allocator to also prefer node 0. Therefore the preferred memory location is now local to the executing program and therefore the speeds are high.

And so on. Just take a look at the source code of the utility.

The results are not very symmetric and the reasons for that are quite complex. Mind that NUMA is badly implemented on Linux, at least in the 2.6.x kernels (things might have improved in 3.x). For example, the memory allocator tends to coalesce consecutive virtual allocations and then the memory binding policy is no longer honoured, e.g. a region of VM bound to node 0 is sometimes mapped onto pages in node 1. Also, if memory gets swapped out to the disk, whenever it is being brought back, the NUMA policy is completely ignored, e.g. memory that was bound to NUMA node 0 might end up on node 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Hristo for the explanation. I was able find useful information on linux.die.net/man/3/numa If we enable memory interleaving from BIOS, can an app override that using libnuma calls ? Is the OS aware of BIOS setting ? –  Harshana Jan 27 at 11:30
    
If you enable the option in the BIOS, it probably reprograms the memory controller(s) to perform physical memory space interleaving (instead of having two huge contiguous blocks). The OS should be able to detect this through the ACPI BIOS tables. It might be possible for a NUMA-aware kernel to reconfigure the memory controller but I doubt that. Instead it would probably treat the memory as uniform. –  Hristo Iliev Jan 27 at 11:44

numademo is a binary provided by numactl package. It provides a quick overview of NUMA performance of the system.

numademo command show the effect of different memory allocation policies on the system.

$ numademo --help
usage: numademo [-S] [-f] [-c] [-e] [-t] msize[kmg] {tests}
No tests means run all.
-c output CSV data. -f run even without NUMA API. -S run stupid tests. -e exit on error
-t regression test; do not run all node combinations
valid tests: memset memcpy forward backward stream random2 ptrchase

Detail of valid test can be check at: https://github.com/jmesmon/numactl/blob/master/numademo.c

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.