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I have a folder with images likes this :

395629_1365148250.png
395629_1365148251.png
395629_1365148252.png
395629_1365148253.png
395629_1365148254.png
415678_1387545677.png
429651_1390056123.png
429651_1390056124.png
429651_1390056125.png
522600_1389607024.png
529485_1389879560.png

The names are this kind : USERID_DATE.png.

My goal is to delete all the older images for each USERID and to keep only the last one.

For example I need to delete these ones:

395629_1365148250.png
395629_1365148251.png
395629_1365148252.png
395629_1365148253.png

and to keep this one.

395629_1365148254.png

If there is only one image per user, I have to keep the image.

I work on this for a long time but I'm able to do the trick. I used the "find" command, but i'm not very good in the bash linux commands, not as good for this anyway.

May be stackoverflow is not the right place to post this kind of demand. In this case, please excuse me.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Seems like basic sorting should be fine for this. So just do something like

#!/bin/bash
for i in $(echo *_*.png | sort); do
  current="$i"
  [[ $current != "" ]] && [[ $last != "" ]] && [[ ${current%%_*} == ${last%%_*} ]] && rm "$last"
  last="$current"
done          

e.g.

$ ls -1
395629_1365148250.png
395629_1365148251.png
395629_1365148252.png
395629_1365148253.png
395629_1365148254.png
415678_1387545677.png
429651_1390056123.png
429651_1390056124.png
429651_1390056125.png
522600_1389607024.png
529485_1389879560.png
$ ./script
$ ls -1
395629_1365148254.png
415678_1387545677.png
429651_1390056125.png
522600_1389607024.png
529485_1389879560.png

If you want it to be recursive in bash 4+ you can just change it to

...
shopt -s globstar
for i in $(echo **/*_*.png | sort)
...

Though in this case I would definitely make sure to check that we're dealing with number_number.png before deleting anything.

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1  
Quote from OP: »… for each userid …« –  Alfe Jan 21 '14 at 12:04
    
@Alfe Yea, misread OP. Still not sure I understand exactly what he wants, but edited –  BroSlow Jan 21 '14 at 12:15
    
It's quite simple. He wants to keep only the newest image of each userid. All other files are to be deleted. –  Alfe Jan 21 '14 at 12:16
1  
@Alfe D'oh I clearly can't read –  BroSlow Jan 21 '14 at 12:18
    
@BroSlow : Alfe is right. I need to keep only the newest image of each userid. In you code, the images 429651_* still remain. –  Pax Maximinus Jan 21 '14 at 12:23

I believe the images are in the order you want because the date is ever increasing (ticks since 1970).

so try this, and exchange the echo for the actual command.

NOTE I was testing this on OS X, so you sed might not like the -E option nvm, -E option on linux is ok too. Sorry for the confusion

NOTE also that the last file is always kept because it will always be the newest file of the last user so there's not even a line of output for it

#!/bin/bash

OLDU="X"
for file in *.png; do
   NEWU=`echo $file|sed -E 's/(......)_.*/\1/g'`
   if [ $NEWU != $OLDU -a $OLDU != X ]; then
      echo keeping $OLDF
   else
      if [ $OLDU != X ]; then
         echo rm $OLDF
      fi
   fi
   OLDF=$file
   OLDU=$NEWU
done

Produces

rm 395629_1365148250.png
rm 395629_1365148251.png
rm 395629_1365148252.png
rm 395629_1365148253.png
keeping 395629_1365148254.png
keeping 415678_1387545677.png
rm 429651_1390056123.png
rm 429651_1390056124.png
keeping 429651_1390056125.png
keeping 522600_1389607024.png
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On linux, the sed E option will work ? –  Pax Maximinus Jan 21 '14 at 12:38

Loop over each userid (You probably have a list of those, so I won't solve that issue by getting them out of the file names), then list all files for that userid in decending order (newest first), then use tail to get all but the topmost and rm all those:

for userid in $userids
do
  rm $(find /path/to/my/images -name "$userid_*.png" -print | sort -r | tail -n +2)
done

In case these inner lists are very large:

for userid in $userids
do
  find /path/to/my/images -name "$userid_*.png" -print | sort -r | tail -n +2 |
    while read oldFile
    do
      rm "$olfFile"
    done
done

To find all userids from the file names only you can use:

userids=$(find /path/to/my/images -name "*_*.png" -print | sed 's/_.*//' | sort -u)
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