Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I just Don't understand how to use a boolean operator inside a switch statement

switch (expression) {
        case > 20:
            statements
            break;
        case < -20:
            statements
            break;
    }

Edit:
I don't want an If () statement.

share|improve this question
    
no behavior when expression == 20? – Mark Elliot Jan 24 '10 at 3:48
    
No, only because case statements are easier to read and they are faster than If () statements. I don't want any behavior when expression == 20. – Jaba Jan 24 '10 at 3:48
1  
They're faster because they're less powerful. You have to compare against fixed values, one at a time. You can't express what you've shown using a switch statement. – zneak Jan 24 '10 at 3:49
up vote 4 down vote accepted
switch ((expression) > 20) {
        case true:
            statements
            break;
        case false:
        default:
            statements
            break;
    }

What.. you want more than 1 boolean in a case? You could do this

int ii = ((expression) > 20) + 2 * ((expression) < -20);
switch (ii) {
        case 1:
            statements
            break;
        case 2:
            statements
            break;
    }

This, IMO is pretty bad code, but it is what you asked for...

Just use the if statement, you'll be better off in the long run.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to remind that it's mostly the comparison that makes if slower than switches, and consequently this won't help your code go faster. – zneak Jan 24 '10 at 4:09
    
actually that's not true. it's the BRANCH that causes the slowdown, not the comparison. But a switch is still a branch. – John Knoeller Jan 24 '10 at 4:23
    
I'm one year late, but in case someone stumbles over this answer, what I meant was that while both if and switch cause a branch (and this is the slowest part), what makes if/else if pairs slower than a switch statement is that they perform one comparison per condition. On the other hand, a switch is usually implemented using clever tricks that make it possible to avoid comparisons completely, no matter how many cases it has. – zneak Apr 24 '11 at 23:46

You can't. Use if() ... else ....

The nearest thing available to what you want uses a GCC extension and is thus non-standard. You can define ranges in case statements instead of just a value:

switch(foo)
{
    case 0 ... 20: // matches when foo is inclusively comprised within 0 and 20
         // do cool stuff
         break;
}

However, you can't use that to match anything under a certain value. It has to be in a precise range. Switches can only be used to replace the comparison operator against a constant, and can't be used for anything more than that.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, speed comes at the cost of flexibility, and there's no way around using a boolean operator instead a switch. It's faster because the CPU has less work to do on it. If you could use a boolean operator inside a switch, there would be no reason if statements would be any slower than switch statements. – zneak Jan 24 '10 at 3:51
    
What happens when I have more than like 5 cases though? – Jaba Jan 24 '10 at 3:52
    
Well, it's just my rule of the thumb, and I didn't mean to make it look like such an absolute rule. You do whatever you like in that case. I'm going to edit that. – zneak Jan 24 '10 at 3:56
1  
Then you use the 'else if' statement to handle them. As others have said, 'switch' is for situations with known result values. – Nicholas Jan 24 '10 at 3:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.