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I have simple SQL query:

SELECT * FROM keys WHERE key LIKE ‘a%o%u’

But I want to get only this columns, where key have first letter "a", in center "o", last letter "u" AND between them no letters a, o and u.

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1  
When you saw o needs to be in the center, do you mean the center, or just anywhere between (either way I'd guess you need a regex for this)? –  Kevin DiTraglia Jan 21 at 13:17
    
Use a Regular Expression. The REGEX gurus will be able to tell you which one. –  Strawberry Jan 21 at 13:19
    

6 Answers 6

SELECT * FROM keys WHERE `key` REGEXP 'a[^aou]*o[^aou]*u'

Regular expression visualization

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awesome picture, i never seen it. (i just register on debuggex) –  Melon Jan 21 at 14:11
    
I get this when I launch it in PHPMyAdmin "#1139 - Got error 'repetition-operator operand invalid' from regexp" –  Ludwik11 Jan 21 at 18:50
    
@Ludwik11 Corrected it, please try again. –  fancyPants Jan 21 at 22:29

Use RLIKE. I am currently on a mobile phone so cant post the full answer. You can look up mysql manual for RLIKE / REGEXP.

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I have not tested much more but you can easily test with your data

like 'a[^aou]%o%[^aou]%u'
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I think there should be "%" after "a" and before "[^aou]" –  Ludwik11 Jan 21 at 13:34
    
Who upvotes this? LIKE doesn't support anything except % and _ as wildcards. –  fancyPants Jan 21 at 13:36

What you're really looking for here is a Regex. Thankfully this can be done. Consider the following expression for your needs:

a([^aou]*[o]{1}[^aou]*)?u

That just needs to be added to the WHERE clause:

SELECT * FROM keys WHERE `key` REGEXP 'a([^au]*[o]{1})*u'

And to help understand the Regex, here's the explanation and demo:

Regular expression visualization

Debuggex Demo

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With this "au" would be possible. And there's no possibility to have characters between o and u. –  fancyPants Jan 21 at 13:35
    
@fancyPants, be more specific please and provide me an example that breaks it and I'll get it modified. –  Michael Perrenoud Jan 21 at 13:40
    
Like I said, "au" breaks it, because there must be a "o" in there. The smallest possible string is "aou". Another example, "aoxu" wouldn't be possible. –  fancyPants Jan 21 at 13:41
    
@fancyPants, I see what you're saying; I've edited. –  Michael Perrenoud Jan 21 at 13:41
    
awesome picture, i never seen it. (i just register on debuggex) –  Melon Jan 21 at 14:11

Try this...

SELECT * FROM keys WHERE (key LIKE 'a%' or key LIKE '%o%' or key LIKE '%u') and (key NOT LIKE '%a%' AND key NOT LIKE '%o%' AND key NOT LIKE '%u%');

The statement doesn't make much sense to me especially the letter 'o' conditions. 1st condition says 'o' should be at the center then 2nd condition says no 'o' in between. But I guess what you want should translate to this. :)

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Maybe this page with Pattern Matching will help you?

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms187489(v=sql.105).aspx

MySQL: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.7/en/pattern-matching.html

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Does that apply to MySQL too? –  Twon-ha Jan 21 at 13:20
    
Oh sorry.. I'm not sure. I saw SQL only so I assumed MS SQL :S –  NickyvV Jan 21 at 13:23

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