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How do I change the use of the IN operator in the following statement:

select stdId, stdName from students where stdId in (:stdsIds)
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closed as unclear what you're asking by Kermit, billinkc, bluefeet, OGHaza, Szymon Mar 6 '14 at 6:59

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
what do you want to change about it –  Tom Jan 21 '14 at 14:43
    
I think you should have this tagged as Oracle instead of SQL Server –  cBlaine Jan 21 '14 at 14:47
    
@cBlaine If you look at the original edit, OP wrote "I am using SQL server currently." I removed oracle. It seems they wanted to convert the query from Oracle to SQL Server. –  Kermit Jan 21 '14 at 15:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Usually, you can avoid IN when you have more than one table involved

If you have something like

SELECT name 
FROM students s 
WHERE student_id IN ( SELECT student_id 
                      FROM courses 
                      WHERE course_id = 1 
                    );

In that case, you could use EXISTS

SELECT name 
FROM students s 
WHERE EXISTS ( SELECT NULL
               FROM courses c
               WHERE c.student_id = s.student_id
                 AND c.course_id = 1
              );
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Use an EXISTS statement instead. So your query would change to this:

select stdId, stdName from students where exists(:stdsIds where stdId = students.stdId)

EDIT: I don't use Oracle but I "think" the syntax would look something like this:

select stdId, stdName from students where exists(:stdsIds = students.stdId)
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