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I am trying to all possible child domains from a given host. I have written following code. It works but my only worry is performance.

Is it required to optimize this code further:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;

public class DemoExtractHostArray {
    public static  String[] createHostArray(String host) {
        String[] stringArr = host.split("\\.");
        String[] hostArray = new String[stringArr.length];
        int hostIndex = 0;

        for(int index = stringArr.length-1; index>=0;index--){
            if(hostIndex==0){ 
                hostArray[hostIndex] = stringArr[index];
            }
            else{
                hostArray[hostIndex] = stringArr[index]+"."+hostArray[hostIndex-1];
            }
            hostIndex++;
        }
        Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(hostArray));
        return hostArray;
    }

    public static void main(String a[]){
        for(String s: createHostArray("a.b.c.d.e.f")){
            System.out.println(s);
        }

    }
}

Output:

a.b.c.d.e.f
b.c.d.e.f
c.d.e.f
d.e.f
e.f
f
share|improve this question
    
Well, does it perform badly? Did you profile your application and find out that this is a hotspot? –  Kayaman Jan 21 at 17:01
    
Optimization isn't "required" unless this is going to be used in a performance-critical loops somewhere. –  keshlam Jan 21 at 17:02
    
Hint: never try to guess performance problems, it's a very inefficient way of finding them. –  Kayaman Jan 21 at 17:03
    
This code will get called millions of times. Based on the traffic. –  Learn More Jan 21 at 17:15
    
If performance is really that much of an issue, you could always declare your methods as "native" and implement them using the Java Native Interface. –  Drew Buckley Jan 21 at 17:59

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The only potential improvement to your code is removing this call:

Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(hostArray));

Since you are creating the hostArray and then reversing it, you might as well change the loop to create the array in reverse order right away, so as to no longer requiring an explicit reversal:

// hostIndex is no longer required - remove the line below:
// int hostIndex = 0;
for(int index = stringArr.length-1 ; index>=0 ; index--){
    if(index == stringArr.length-1) {
        hostArray[index] = stringArr[index];
    }
    else{
        hostArray[index] = stringArr[index]+"."+hostArray[index+1];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can also create StringBuilder[] instead of String[]. Your source code in if statement could look like this: hostArray[index].append(....); Think about it. –  Michał Ziober Jan 21 at 17:19
    
@MichałZiober This will not improve much, because each concatenation is done only once, and all the intermediate results are kept. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 21 at 17:22
    
Yes, you are right. –  Michał Ziober Jan 21 at 18:36

I would personally use recusion. This implementation does not require the reversal of the array and, in my opinion, may be easier to follow.

http://ideone.com/MnMZOL

package com.poachit.utility.web;

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;

public class DemoExtractHostArray {
     public static void createHostArray(String[] root, String[] result, int index) {

        String host="";
        int i = index;
        if (index == root.length) {
            return;
        }
        for ( ; i < root.length-1; i++) {           
            host += root[i] + ".";
        }

        if (i < root.length) {
            host += root[i];
        }

        result[index] = host;
        createHostArray(root, result, ++index);
    }

    public static void main (String[] args) throws java.lang.Exception
    {
        String host = "a.b.c.d.e.f";

        String [] tokens = host.split("\\.");

        String [] result = new String[tokens.length];

      createHostArray(tokens, result, 0);

      for (String s : result) {
        System.out.println(s);
      }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's a tail-call. Recursion is unnecessary and overly expensive for this task; you can simply loop, incrementing index each time through the loop until index==root.length. Even simpler and easier to read, as well as more performant. –  keshlam Jan 22 at 4:50
    
unless he is doing hundreds of thousands of hosts performance really is negligible. You won't notice execution time hits from adding a few frames on the stack through recursion. this really is a matter of preference. –  75inchpianist Jan 22 at 5:37
    
Absolutely agree. But the question as posed was performance. And loop is clearer than tailcall for a beginner. –  keshlam Jan 22 at 5:39

You can optimize the code like this

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.List;

public class Test {
    public static  String[] createHostArray(String host) {
        String[] stringArr = host.split("\\.");
        String[] hostArray = new String[stringArr.length];
        int hostIndex = 0;

        for(int index = stringArr.length-1; index>=0;index--){
            if(hostIndex==0){ 
                hostArray[hostIndex] = stringArr[index];
            }
            else{
                hostArray[hostIndex] = stringArr[index]+"."+hostArray[hostIndex-1];
            }
            hostIndex++;
        }
        Collections.reverse(Arrays.asList(hostArray));
        return hostArray;
    }

    public static  String[] betterCreateHostArray(String host) {
        List<String> hostList = new ArrayList<String>();
        do {
            if(!host.contains(".")) {
                hostList.add(host);
                break;
            } else {
                hostList.add(host);
                host = host.substring(host.indexOf('.')+1);
            }
        } while(host.length() > 0);

        return hostList.toArray(new String[hostList.size()]);
    }

    public static void main(String a[]){
        long startTime = System.nanoTime();
        String[] array = createHostArray("a.b.c.d.e.f");
        long endTime = System.nanoTime();
        long timeByFirstApproach = endTime - startTime;

        for(String s: array){
            System.out.println(s);
        }
        System.out.println("=====");
        startTime = System.nanoTime();
        array = betterCreateHostArray("a.b.c.d.e.f");
        endTime = System.nanoTime();
        long timeBySecondApproach = endTime - startTime;
        for(String s: array){
            System.out.println(s);
        }
        System.out.println(String.format("Time taken by first approach=[%d] nano seconds and\n"
                + "Time taken by second approach=[%d] nano seconds", timeByFirstApproach,timeBySecondApproach));
    }
}

and here the performance result

a.b.c.d.e.f
b.c.d.e.f
c.d.e.f
d.e.f
e.f
f
=====
a.b.c.d.e.f
b.c.d.e.f
c.d.e.f
d.e.f
e.f
f
Time taken by first approach=[1625572] nano seconds and Time taken by second approach=[308289] nano seconds
Second approach is more than 5 times faster than the approach you are following.

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