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I would like to add to a template class a constructor that builds a specialized object with some initializations. This is the class I'm working on:

template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata> class t_simple_db{
 private:
  typedef typename std::list<std::pair<Tkey,vector<Tdata>>> t_internal;
  t_internal _db;

 public:
  typedef typename t_internal::const_iterator const_iterator;
  typedef typename t_internal::iterator iterator;

  t_simple_db(){;}
  ~t_simple_db(){;}

  //many methods
};

Now I would like to

typedef t_simple_db<string,double> t_simple_db_sd;

and to write a special constructor for it so that in the main I can simply call something like this:

t_simple_db_sd db("this is a string", 100u);

having a correct instantiated and initialized object. I tried to place this in the header after the class declaration:

typedef t_simple_db<string, double> t_simple_db_sd;
template<> t_simple_db<string, double>::t_simple_db(...) {
  ...
}

but I get a bunch of multiple definition errors when I try to compile.

share|improve this question
6  
Can you show us what you have tried so far? –  dyp Jan 21 at 17:05
    
If you have C++11 you might use a variadic template for it, so class... Args as a template parameter. –  CashCow Jan 21 at 17:07
    
@dyp Do NOT take the random example as the question. That could be done in a bunch of ways. The point is how to write a constructor that returns a specialized object. –  DarioP Jan 21 at 17:50
    
I dont't quite understand what you want to do. Could you elaborate? Perhaps with some code? –  dyp Jan 21 at 18:22
    
@dyp I see, evidently my question was not well asked. I hope is much clearer now. –  DarioP Jan 22 at 10:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If this is your class template:

template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata> class t_simple_db{
 private:
  typedef typename std::list<std::pair<Tkey,vector<Tdata>>> t_internal;
  t_internal _db;

 public:
  typedef typename t_internal::const_iterator const_iterator;
  typedef typename t_internal::iterator iterator;

  t_simple_db(){;}
  ~t_simple_db(){;}

  //many methods
};

Then any (implicit) specialization only has a default constructor. You could

  1. Add a non-default ctor to the (primary) class template

    template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata> class t_simple_db{
      /* ... */
    
      t_simple_db(){;}
      t_simple_db(Tkey, std::size_t n) { /*...*/ }
      ~t_simple_db(){;}
    
      //many methods
    };
    

    In order to define the ctor outside the class definition, put in the header file:

    template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata>
    t_simple_db::t_simple_db() { /* ... */ }
    
  2. Partially or explicitly specialize the class template

    template <> class t_simple_db<std::string, double>{
      /* ... */
      t_simple_db(std::string, std::size_t n) { /*...*/ }
      ~t_simple_db(){}
    
      //many methods
    };
    

    In order to define the ctor outside the class definition: Explicitly (= fully) specialized class templates are "ordinary" classes, not templates (you cannot create types from them, they are types with strange names). Therefore, the usual rules for functions + ODR apply: preferably put them into the source file (cpp), alternatively as inline or with internal linkage in the header file

    // no `template`
    t_simple_db<std::string, double>::t_simple_db(..) { /*...*/ }
    
    // or
    typedef t_simple_db<string, double> t_simple_db_sd;
    t_simple_db_sd::t_simple_db(..) { /*...*/ }
    

In your pastebin, there's a ctor

t_simple_db(const string& keys, const size_t& res );

I wouldn't recommend putting this ctor in the primary template: Not all specializations of t_simple_db might use strings as Tkeys. You can use inheritance to provide an additional ctor only for certain specializations, e.g.

// header file

template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata> class t_simple_db_base{
 public:
  t_simple_db_base(){;}
  ~t_simple_db_base(){;} // possibly virtual

  //many methods
};

template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata>
class t_simple_db : public t_simple_db_base<Tkey, Tdata>{
 public:
  t_simple_db(){;}
  ~t_simple_db(){;}
};

// explicit specialization of `t_simple_db`
template <>
class t_simple_db<std::string, double>
    : public t_simple_db_base<std::string, double>{
 public:
  t_simple_db(){;}
  t_simple_db(const string& keys, const size_t& res);
  ~t_simple_db(){;}
};

typedef t_simple_db<std::string, double> t_simple_db_sd;


// source file

//template <>  <-- not a member function of a class template,
//                 but of an "ordinary class"
t_simple_db_sd::t_simple_db(const string& keys, const size_t& res)
{
    /*...*/
}

The reason why this function must be in the source file is that it is not a template. I.e., it's not a blueprint that the compiler uses to make functions, but it's a complete function itself. Therefore, it needs to follow the One Definition Rule. As opposed to templates and members of class templates, the linker does not merge the definitions. You can also provide the definition inside the class definition, implicitly making the function inline. It's possible as well to provide that definition in the header file outside the class definition, if you explicitly mark the function as inline. If the function is inline, it may appear in multiple translation units.

It is also possible to declare the ctor for all specializations but only define it for t_simple_db<std::string, double>. I don't recommend this approach because misusing the ctor for other specializations will only cause a linker error. Nevertheless, here's how you can do that:

// header file

template <typename Tkey, typename Tdata> class t_simple_db{
 public:
  t_simple_db(){;}
  t_simple_db(const string& keys, const size_t& res );
  ~t_simple_db(){;}

  //many methods
};

typedef t_simple_db<std::string, double> t_simple_db_sd;


// source file
template <>   // <-- this is a member function of a class template,
              //     therefore we need the `template <>`
              //     in this example, t_simple_db_sd is *not* an explicit
              //     specialization
t_simple_db_sd::t_simple_db(const string& keys, const size_t& res)
{
    /*...*/
}

This function isn't a template either, so the same rules apply as for the member function of an explicit specialization / as for normal functions.

share|improve this answer
    
I would really like to upvote and accept, but I can not go with any of those methods. I keep getting multiple definitions or "not matching any template declaration" errors. I do not understand what's the correct way to go. pfff I'm wasting so much time on this :( –  DarioP Jan 22 at 15:04
    
@DarioP Could you provide a self-contained example that reproduces the problem? Most importantly, please include where you put the parts of your code (header/source file). –  dyp Jan 22 at 15:06
    
@DarioP It sounds like you combined not specializing the class template with a out-of-line definition of a ctor for an explicitly specialized class template in the one case, and explicitly specializing the class template, but providing the out-of-line definition of the ctor in the header file in the other case. –  dyp Jan 22 at 15:09
    
Trying to produce and single file example I managed to get it work many ours ago, but I cannot plug it into the whole project without compiler or linker errors. This is the full header pastebin.com/bS1TuQJE it contains a couple of my dozens of attempts. I have some source files containing no more than failed attempts (I don't need them for other thing). Maybe it's just a silly mistake driving me crazy. I'll work on something else for a while. –  DarioP Jan 22 at 15:42
    
@DarioP See the update. Hope that helps. –  dyp Jan 22 at 17:16

There is a way using variadic templates to do something like this:

template< typename T, typename Alloc >
class MyVector
{
 private:
      T* mem;
 public:

     template< Class... Args >
     MyVector( size_t i, Args &&... args )
     {
          mem = Alloc::alloc( i ); // "pseudo" code to allocate the memory
          for( size_t idx = 0; idx < i; ++idx )
          {
             new ( mem + idx )  T( std::forward<Args>(args)... );
          }
     }
 };
share|improve this answer
    
It's new to me and I can't promise the syntax works exactly but it is possible using variadic templates. –  CashCow Jan 21 at 17:16
    
I do not need anything like this. I have no args to pass... maybe the question is not clear enough. –  DarioP Jan 21 at 17:51
    
You forgot std::forward and ellipsis operators: Args &&... args, T( std::forward<Args>(args)... ). But you can't do it in this way: for cycle is not suitable for iterating through parameters of variadic template. –  Constructor Jan 21 at 17:52
    
The "for" cycle doesn't iterate through the parameters, it iterates through your elements of the vector. Of course we could create one with the variadic args then copy-construct that one to all the elements in the vector. The spec doesn't say we can't do that, just that the constructor should be part of his vector class. –  CashCow Jan 22 at 9:12
    
@CashCow Sorry, I didn't understand your code yesterday so my remark about for cycle was incorrect. –  Constructor Jan 22 at 19:33

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