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I have the following folder structure;

myapp\
  myapp\
     __init__.py
  tests\
     test_ecprime.py

and my pwd is

C:\Users\wwerner\programming\myapp\

I have the following test setup:

import pytest
import sys
import pprint

def test_cool():
    pprint.pprint(sys.path)
    assert False

That produces the following paths:

['C:\\Users\\wwerner\\programming\\myapp\\tests',
 'C:\\Users\\wwerner\\programming\\envs\\myapp\\Scripts',
 'C:\\Windows\\system32\\python34.zip',
 'C:\\Python34\\DLLs',
 'C:\\Python34\\lib',
 'C:\\Python34',
 'C:\\Users\\wwerner\\programming\\envs\\myapp',
 'C:\\Users\\wwerner\\programming\\envs\\myapp\\lib\\site-packages']

And when I try to import myapp I get the following error:

ImportError: No module named 'ecprime'

So it looks like it's not adding the current directory to my path.

By changing my import line to look like this:

import sys
sys.path.insert(0, '.')
import myapp

I am then able to import myapp with no problems.

Why does my current directory not show up in the path when running pytest? Is my only workaround to insert . into the sys.path? (I'm using Python 3.4 if it matters)

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Have you tried importing myapp before importing pytest (to make sure pytest is the problem here)? Try import myapp as the very first line in the script. –  Sunny Nanda Jan 21 at 17:35
    
@SunnyNanda tried that, too. Still doesn't work. –  Wayne Werner Jan 21 at 20:29

3 Answers 3

Use the environment variable PYTHONPATH.

In Windows:

set PYTHONPATH=.
py.test

In Unix:

PYTHONPATH=. py.test
share|improve this answer
    
This shouldn't be necessary because by default the current directory should be inserted in sys.path. Refer docs.python.org/3/library/sys.html#sys.path –  Sunny Nanda Jan 21 at 17:37
    
@SunnyNanda, It is not the current working directory that is inserted, but the directory containing the script. –  falsetru Jan 21 at 17:39
    
Thanks for the correction. I was earlier assuming the script to be present in the main directory itself. I added an answer with the assumption that the called script is placed in a child directory. –  Sunny Nanda Jan 21 at 17:45

sys.path automatically has the script's directory in it, and not the current working directory.

I am guessing that your script in placed in tests directory. Based on this assumption, your code should look like this:

import sys
import os

ROOT_DIR = os.path.dirname(os.path.dirname(__file__))
sys.path.append(ROOT_DIR)

import myapp # Should work now
share|improve this answer

Ahah!

After comparing the layout of my cookiecutter repo, it turns out to be way more simple (and better) than that.

tests/
    __init__.py
    test_myapp.py

A simple addition of the __init__.py file to my test dir allows me to run py.test from my main directory.

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