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I am trying to make program that prints all the possible combinations for a to zzz. I tried to add a save state feature, and it works fine but there is this bug.

Let's say I interrupted the program when it printed something like e. When I execute the program again, it works fine until z but after z instead of printing aa it prints ba and continues from ba. This happens right after it prints zz too. it prints baa instead of aaa. How can I fix this?

Here is what I did so far:

 import pickle,os,time

 alphabet="abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
 try:
     if os.path.isfile("save.pickle")==True:
         with open("save.pickle","rb") as f:
             tryn=pickle.load(f)
         for i in range(3):
             a=[x for x in alphabet]
             for j in range(i):
                 a=[x+i for x in alphabet for i in a]
             b=a[tryn:]
             for k in b:
                 print(k)
                 time.sleep(0.01)
                 tryn+=1
     else:
         tryn=0
         for i in range(3):
             a=[x for x in alphabet]
             for j in range(i):
                 a=[x+i for x in alphabet for i in a]
             for k in a:
                 print(k)
                 tryn+=1
                 time.sleep(0.01)
 except KeyboardInterrupt:
     with open("save.pickle","wb") as f:
         pickle.dump(tryn,f)
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2  
Use deeper indents. 4 spaces is the recommended size. This is very hard to read. – user2357112 Jan 21 '14 at 18:13

If you're using python2, or python3 as the tag suggests, this exists in the standard library already. See itertools, product py2, and product py3, for a simple way to solve this problem.

share|improve this answer
    
permutations is the wrong function. product is what you're looking for. – user2357112 Jan 21 '14 at 18:40
    
+1 It's fun to deal with the bare code but we should always remember the standard library has a lot of juice to be squeezed. – Manuel Gutierrez Jan 21 '14 at 18:40
    
Ah yeah, if you're wanting repeated characters as you'd clearly said that's the function you'd want. With this though you're still going to need one loop to up the desired length of returned combinations. – Morgan Jan 21 '14 at 19:01
  for i in range(3):
   a=[x for x in alphabet]
   for j in range(i):
    a=[x+i for x in alphabet for i in a]
   b=a[tryn:]

Here's your bug. You skip the first tryn strings of every length, rather than just the first tryn strings. This would be easier to recognize in the output if it weren't for the following:

   for k in b:
    print(k)
    time.sleep(0.01)
    tryn+=1

You modify tryn, the number of things you're skipping. When you print out length-2 strings, you skip a number of them equal to the number of length-1 strings. When you print out length-3 strings, you skip a number of them equal to the number of length-2 strings. If tryn were bigger than the number of length-1 strings, you would skip even more.

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i dont think thats the problem since the output is always the same: "ba" even if i interrupted at a OR z. though if you really think this is the problem, can you give me some hints or something? – user3220419 Jan 21 '14 at 18:27
    
@user3220419: That's explained in the second half of the answer. As for hints, skip the first tryn of the complete sequence. You could do this by building one big list of all the strings and then slicing that. – user2357112 Jan 21 '14 at 18:29

your problem is almost certainly here:

a=[x for x in alphabet]
for j in range(i):
    a=[x+i for x in alphabet for i in a]

Perhaps you shouldn't assign the in-loop value to a, but instead use a different name? Otherwise, you are changing what you use every time through the loop....

Edit: More detail. So, technically user2357112's answer is more correct, but I'm amending mine. The initial answer was just from a quick reading, so the other answer is close to the original intent. But, the original version is inefficient (for more reasons than not using product :), since you are generating the inner loops more than once. So let's walk through why this is a bad idea, as an educational exercise:

Initial algorithm:

for i in range(n):
    assign a to alphabet
    for j in range(i): 
        i times, we rewrite a to be all combinations of the current set against the alphabet.

Note that for this algorithm, to generate the length(n) product, we have to generate all previous products length(n-1), length(n-2), ..., length(1). But you aren't saving those.

You'd be better off doing something like this:

sum_list = alphabet[:]
#get a copy
product_list = alphabet[:]
#Are we starting at 0, or 1? In any case, skip the first, since we preloaded it
for i in range(1, n):
    # Your existing list comprehension was equivalent here, and could still be used
    # it MIGHT be faster to do '%s%s'%(x,y) instead of x+y... but maybe not
    # with these short strings
    # This comprehension takes the result of the last iteration, and makes the next iteration
    product_list = [x+y for x,y in product(product_list, alphabet)]
    # So product list is JUST the list for range (n) - i.e. if we are on loop 2, this
    # is aaa...zzz. But you want all lengths together. So, as you go, add these
    # sublists to a main list.
    sum_list.extend(product_list)

Overall, you are doing a lot less work.

Couple other things:

  • You're using i as a loop variable, then re-using it in the loop comprehension. This is conflicting, and probably not working the way you'd expect.
  • If this is to learn how to write save/restore type apps... it's not a good one. Note that the restore function is re-calculating every value to be able to get back where it left off - if you could rewrite this algorithm to write more information out to the file (such as the current value of product_list) and make it more generator-like, then it will actually work more like a real-world example.
share|improve this answer
    
can you show me a example? i have tried that actually, but it always says that its not defined even if its defined – user3220419 Jan 21 '14 at 18:20
    
Actually, now that I've looked at it more, I think i see what you are trying to do. Try replacing a=[x+i for x... with a.extend([x+i for x... and see if that helps. – Corley Brigman Jan 21 '14 at 18:26
    
it works, corley! thanks! can you explain what this does though? – user3220419 Jan 21 '14 at 18:32
    
@user3220419: That modification does not do what you think it does. It happened to introduce a bug that partially counteracts your existing bug; you're still skipping the first tryn strings each time around, but now the list has tryn junk elements in front before what you want to print. There are still problems; I believe you'll go through the length-2 strings twice. – user2357112 Jan 21 '14 at 18:39
    
yeah, i think it's still not really correct... it looks like this is sort of a recursive loop which summation. which is fine as an exercise. note that it's also using i as a loop variable (for i in range(3)) and also in the list comprehension, which is conflicting. However, in the interest of explaining the algorithm, i'll add some detail. – Corley Brigman Jan 21 '14 at 18:43

Here is how I would suggest solving this problem in Python. I didn't implement the save state feature; this sequence is not a really long one and your computer should be able to produce this sequence pretty fast, so I don't think it is worth the effort to try to make it cleanly interruptable.

import itertools as it

def seq(alphabet, length):
    for c in range(1, length+1):
        for p in it.product(alphabet, repeat=c):
            yield ''.join(p)

alphabet="abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"

for x in seq(alphabet, 3):
    print(x)

If you really wanted to, you could make a one-liner using itertools. I think this is too hard to read and understand; I prefer the above version. But this does work and will be somewhat faster, due to the use of itertools.chain and itertools.imap() rather than a Python for loops.

import itertools as it

def seq(alphabet, length):
    return it.imap(''.join, it.chain.from_iterable(it.product(alphabet, repeat=c) for c in range(1, length+1)))

alphabet="abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"

for x in seq(alphabet, 3):
    print(x)

In Python 3.x you could just use map() rather than itertools.imap().

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