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person_id | manager_id | name |
          |            |      |
-------------------------------

Query to find name of manager who supervises maximum number of employees?

Added: This is the only table. Yes self-referencing. DB is mysql. Recursive queries will also do.

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Do you want a recursive query? –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 10:48
1  
still none of the answers work!!! –  AJ. Jan 24 '10 at 11:21
1  
What is the name of your table? –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 11:23
    
Ankit: Perhaps if you answered the clarifying questions, more people would be interested in answering your question?! –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 11:24
1  
A recursive query is more difficult. I have already submitted an answer about half-an-hour ago using a non-recusive query. Have you even looked at it yet? There is little point in me answering your questions if you don't even look at my answers. There is no reason to be desperate. Describe your question more clearly and more accurately. The quality of the answers depend on the quality of the question. –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 12:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's not entirely clear to me what you want, so if this isn't what you want please clarify your question.

This query returns just one of the managers if there is a tie:

SELECT T2.name FROM (
    SELECT manager_id
    FROM table1
    WHERE manager_id IS NOT NULL
    GROUP BY manager_id
    ORDER BY count(*) DESC
    LIMIT 1
) AS T1
JOIN table1 AS T2
ON T1.manager_id = T2.person_id

Result of query:

Bar

Here's a query that fetches all managers with the tied maximum count in the case that there is a tie:

SELECT name FROM (
    SELECT manager_id, COUNT(*) AS C
    FROM person
    WHERE manager_id IS NOT NULL
    GROUP BY manager_id) AS Counts
JOIN (
    SELECT COUNT(*) AS C
    FROM person
    WHERE manager_id IS NOT NULL
    GROUP BY manager_id
    ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC
    LIMIT 1
) AS MaxCount
ON Counts.C = MaxCount.C
JOIN person
ON Counts.manager_id = person.person_id

Result of the second query:

Foo
Bar

Here's my test data:

CREATE TABLE Table1 (person_id int NOT NULL, manager_id nvarchar(100) NULL, name nvarchar(100) NOT NULL);
INSERT INTO Table1 (person_id, manager_id, name) VALUES
(1, NULL, 'Foo'),
(2, '1', 'Bar'),
(3, '1', 'Baz'),
(4, '2', 'Qux'),
(5, '2', 'Quux'),
(6, '3', 'Corge');
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works perfectly! –  AJ. Jan 24 '10 at 12:06
    
thank you!!!! Mark –  AJ. Jan 24 '10 at 12:11
1  
You're welcome. It took me a long time to figure out exactly what you wanted. Thanks for being patient with my constant questions. :) Next time you post a similar question, I'll probably ask you very similar questions, so it would be a good idea to put the answers in your question from the start. –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 12:16

This query returns the manager_id and manager_name of the manager with the maximal number of employees.

The trick is in the HAVING clause, which allows aggregates and counts over multiple rows.

SELECT manager_id,name, count(*) 
    FROM table 
    GROUP BY manager_id, name
    HAVING max(count(*));

You can read more in the short but informative w3schools.com HAVING clause tutorial.

If the manager_id references a person id in the same table, Svinto's answer might be more suitable.

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+1 This is smarter than the question, as it allows for a tie. –  egrunin Jan 24 '10 at 10:51
    
There is no manager_name column. –  svinto Jan 24 '10 at 10:52
    
I stand corrected - changed manager_name to name. –  Adam Matan Jan 24 '10 at 10:55
    
You have to change that also in the GROUP BY clause. –  Felix Kling Jan 24 '10 at 10:57
1  
SQL Error - Invalid use of group function –  AJ. Jan 24 '10 at 11:08
SELECT name 
FROM table 
WHERE person_id = (
    SELECT manager_id 
    FROM table 
    GROUP BY manager_id 
    HAVING max(count(*)))
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1  
+1 ...and this one noticed that we need the name, not the id, but it doesn't allow for a tie. –  egrunin Jan 24 '10 at 10:52
    
Unknown column 'count' in 'having clause' –  AJ. Jan 24 '10 at 10:57
    
+1 for noticing self reference; I think it should be `HAVING max(count(*)) –  Adam Matan Jan 24 '10 at 10:57
    
Should be max(count(*)). Still doesn't allow for a tie, however. –  egrunin Jan 24 '10 at 10:58
1  
SQL Error - Invalid use of group function –  AJ. Jan 24 '10 at 11:07

Assuming manager_id have a reference to person_id and name of table: table_name

SELECT name FROM (
  SELECT manager_id
  FROM table_name
  GROUP BY manager_id
  ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC
  LIMIT 1
) t
INNER JOIN table_name ON t.manager_id = table_name.person_id

edit: Removed HAVING MAX COUNT, added ORDER BY COUNT DESC LIMIT 1 in subquery

share|improve this answer
    
-1: Invalid use of group function. –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 12:20
    
@Mark, you're right, returned to my previous answer. –  Alex LE Jan 24 '10 at 12:33
    
Sorry but this still doesn't work for (1, NULL, 'Foo'),(2, NULL, 'Bar'), (3, 1, 'Baz') as it returns no rows instead of FOO. Sorry for picking on your answer in particular - everyone else here has made the same mistake too. I chose yours because it had no comments and others have more serious errors too that have already been pointed out. See my answer for a working version. –  Mark Byers Jan 24 '10 at 12:52

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