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Update:
I know how to parse XML, but not exactly where in the architecture, see problems defined below.
All suggestions are welcome!


Fighting my way into Laravel, I try to build a form from a XML file.

Problems:

  1. how to get the data from the XML into the view?
  2. where to build that form - in terms of repetition, I'd prefer to create the form once, and use it for create, edit and view
  3. validation - I'd like to reuse it as much as possible

the XML: foods_form.xml (simplified):

<form>
    <field id="1" name="cheese" label="favorite cheese?" type="radio" req="1" filter="int">
        <option id="1" value="1">Camembert</option>
        <option id="2" value="3">Gouda</option>
    </field>
    <field id="2" name="beer" label="favorite beer?" type="text" req="1" filter="str" />
</form>

the view: app/views/create.blade.php:

@extends('layout')
@section('content')

<form action="{{ action('FormsController@handleCreate') }}" method="post" role="form">

    @foreach ($fields as $field)
        <label for="{{ $field->name }}">{{ $field->label }}</label>

        @if ($field->type == 'text')
            <input type="text" name="{{ $field->name }}" />
        @else
            @foreach ($field->option as $option)
                <input type="radio" name="{{ $field->name }}" value="{{ $option }}" />
            @endforeach
        @endif
    @endforeach    

    <input type="submit" value="Create" />
    <a href="{{ action('FormsController@index') }}">Cancel</a>
</form>
@stop

the controller: app/controllers/FormsController.php:

class TestsController extends BaseController {

    public function index() {
        // return some view
    }

    public function create() {
        return View::make('create');
    }

    public function handleCreate() {
        // validation according to XML
        // save to database if valid || return to form if not valid
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted
+100

Below is a start on the type of class you could build to handle your XML to HTML form conversion.

<?php

class XmlToHtmlFormConverter {


    public function buildFormContent($filename)
    {
        $xml_fields = new SimpleXmlElement($filename, 0, true);
        $html = '';

        foreach ($xml_fields as $field) {
            $attributes = $field->attributes();
            $html .= '<label for="'.$attributes['name'].'">'.$attributes['label'].'</label>'.PHP_EOL;

            if ('text' == $attributes['type']) {
                $html .= '<input type="text" name="'.$attributes['name'].'" />'.PHP_EOL;
            } else {
                $html .= $this->buildOptionInputs($field);
            }
        }

        return $html;
    }


    protected function buildOptionInputs($field)
    {
        $html = '';
        $attributes = $field->attributes();
        foreach ($field->option as $option) {
            $html .= '<input type="radio" name="'.$attributes['name'].'" value="'.$option.'" />'.PHP_EOL;
        }
        return $html;
    }
}

// Uncomment below to actually see the output, this works with your xml file.
// $converter = new XmlToHtmlFormConverter;
// echo $converter->buildFormContent('form.xml');

As a previous answer stated, you could inject this class into your controller constructor. If you want to get fancy you can create an interface and inject that, then bind your implementation to that interface with App::bind('SomeInterface', 'SomeImplementation'); but to keep it simple you can just inject the class directly.

Controller:

class TestsController extends BaseController {

    protected $xml_to_html_form_converter;


    public function __construct(XmlToHtmlFormConverter $xml_to_html_form_converter)
    {
        $this->xml_to_html_form_converter = $xml_to_html_form_converter;
    }


    public function index() {
        // return some view
    }


    public function create() {
        $xml_file_path = 'some/path/xmlfile.xml';
        return View::make('create')->with(array(
            'form_content' => $this->xml_to_html_form_converter->buildFormContent($xml_file_path);
        ));
    }


    public function handleCreate() {
        // do your validations like you would with any html form
    }
}

And then your view would be like this...

@extends('layout')
@section('content')

<form action="{{ action('FormsController@handleCreate') }}" method="post" role="form">

    {{ $form_content }}

    <input type="submit" value="Create" />
    <a href="{{ action('FormsController@index') }}">Cancel</a>
</form>
@stop
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Thanks, this is very helpful! –  michi Jan 31 at 17:55
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Laravel won't be helping you creating forms from some XML.

You'll need to parse your XML with a library like SimpleXML : you'll find some documentation here, on php.net

Begin with creating a SimpleXMLElement :

$xml = new SimpleXMLElement('../path/to/your/file/foods_form.xml', 0, true);

You can now use your $xml object to generate your form, respecting the format of your XML (dump your $xml object to have an idea of the structure)

Simply put your object in your view to use it directly.

To validate your form, you can use Validation from Laravel : link to the doc

share|improve this answer
    
OK, I can parse the file. Coding that logic into the view seems not very MVC-like to me. Any ideas? –  michi Jan 22 at 20:20
    
Create a class to parse $xml into an HTML form and inject it into your controllers via the constructor? Then your controller could do something like: $xml = new SimpleXMLElement('../path/to/forms.xml'); $html = $this->xml_form_parser->parseToHtml($xml); –  patricksayshi Jan 24 at 19:50
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I have yet to find an XSL friendly MVC.

The way I do it (Huge fan of XSL in views)

Final Page will have 3 modules lets say:

My view will only contain

// I don't know how you simply echo a variable from "yet another framework"
// but this is the only thing you need to do from the view
echo $someModule;
echo $otherModule;
echo $lastModule;

My controller will have 3 extra dependencies injected to contain whatever logic I got to execute. And use the simplest class to apply my xsl

<?php
class SomeController extends SomeMvcController {

    private $someModuleLogic;
    private $otherModuleLogic;
    private $lastModuleLogic;
    private $xslTransformer;


    public function __construct( XslTransformer $xslTransformer, $someModuleLogic, $otherModuleLogic, $lastModuleLogic ) {
        $this->someModuleLogic  = $someModuleLogic;
        $this->otherModuleLogic = $otherModuleLogic;
        $this->lastModuleLogic  = $lastModuleLogic;

        parent::__construct();
        $this->xslTransformer = $xslTransformer;
    }


    public function someAction() {

        /**
         * doStuff functions will take your parameters like get, post etc and return a DomDocument object
         * which can be programmatically calculated via PHP or generated by reading an XML file (or xml from any buffer)
         */
        $someModule  = $this->xslTransformer->transform(
            'myViews/modules/someModule.xsl',
            $this->someModeuleLogic->doStuff()
    );
        $otherModule = $this->xslTransformer->transform(
            'myViews/modules/otherModule.xsl',
            $this->otherModeuleLogic->doStuff()
    );
        $lastModule  = $this->xslTransformer->transform(
            'myViews/modules/lastModule.xsl',
            $this->lastModeuleLogic->doStuff()
    );        }
}



class XslTransformer {

    public function transform( $xslLocation, DOMDocument $domDocument ) {
        $xslDocument = new DOMDocument();
        $xslDocument->load( $xslLocation );

        $xsltProcessor = new XSLTProcessor();
        $xsltProcessor->importStylesheet( $xslDocument );

        $document                     = $xsltProcessor->transformToDoc( $domDocument );
        $document->encoding           = 'UTF-8';
        $document->formatOutput       = true;
        $document->preserveWhiteSpace = false;

        return $document;
    }
}

This keeps my views/controllers very small and simple without any logic. Everything is done in the injected class and I can chop that one into tiny simple pieces.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'm new to XSL and will definitely look into it. –  michi Jan 31 at 17:56
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