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So I have this project where I have to match strings (which are really long so I used a util to combine multiple strings into a single string) to passwords (to see how many match) but I have 10,000 passwords I need to check, so I can't manually enter them in one at a time with proper regex expressions. Is there a way I can format them into a list, perhaps with commas? Here is my code currently, with the first few "passwords" manually entered.

import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.List;


public class RegexTestPatternMatcher {
public static final String test = org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.join(new String[] {
"multiple",
"strings",
"here"
} );

public static final String bib = org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.join(new String[] {

"different",
"strings",
"here"
} );

public static final String dict = org.apache.commons.lang3.StringUtils.join(new String[] {
"even more",
"strings",
"here"
} );

 List<String> testlist = Arrays.asList(dict.split("\\s*.,\\s*."));
public static void main(String[] args) {
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\S+", Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
// in case you would like to ignore case sensitivity,
// you could use this statement:
// Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("\\s+", Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(test);
// check all occurance
while (matcher.find()) 
{
  System.out.print("Start index: " + matcher.start());
  System.out.print(" End index: " + matcher.end() + " ");
  System.out.println(matcher.group());
}

// now create a new pattern and matcher to replace whitespace with tabs
Pattern replace = Pattern.compile("\\s+");
Matcher matcher2 = replace.matcher(test);
System.out.println(matcher2.replaceAll("\t"));
double scarlet = 0;
double bible = 0;
double dictionary = 0;

if(test.matches(".*?//bpassword//b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
System.out.println("hello?");
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\b123456\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\b12345678\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\b1234\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\bqwerty\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\b12345\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\bdragon\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
    if(test.matches(".*?\\bpussy\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet += 1;
}
System.out.println("Scarlet Letter Matches: " + scarlet);

//and so on...

but I have SO MANY words/strings i want to match to the original test, (10,000 to be exact) and I have them in a word document and can format them with commas really easily, but putting them in between the formating above would actually take a week. Is there a way to match the original string to a list?

Edit I've gotten it so it reads the code, however it always comes up as the amount of times it runs (11 if I put in 10, 101 if I put in 100, etc.)

int scarlet = 0;
int bible = 0;
int dictionary = 0;
int x = 0;

List<String> passwords = Arrays.asList(password.split(".*\\s,\\s.*"));

 for(x = 0; x <= 10; x++)
 {
if(test.matches(".*?\\b" + passwords + "\\b.*?"))
{
scarlet++;
}
  }

The Above comes out with Scarlet = 11 at the end, if I do (x = 0; x <= 10000; x++) it comes out as 10,001.

share|improve this question
    
Please clean and format your code. Only post meaningful code on your question. –  Everton Agner Jan 22 '14 at 0:36
    
You have a list of passwords in a file, and you have a list of strings that you need to check if there is a match to these passwords. Do I understand this right? –  Indu Devanath Jan 22 '14 at 0:47
    
@EvertonAgner Sorry, I'm extremely new to Java and programming and don't know what would be helpful in solving the problem and what wouldn't be, just wanted to give people as much information as they need. –  user3221458 Jan 23 '14 at 23:37
    
@InduDevanath Yes, I want to check if the word(s) in the password list match any word in the list of strings. –  user3221458 Jan 23 '14 at 23:38
    
@user3221458 No problem. The thing is: try to show only relevant parts of your code. Indenting it is pretty cool also :) –  Everton Agner Jan 24 '14 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

try loading your 10000 passwords into a database and then use sql to test if the exist or not. The way you are doing it will (as you say) take forever and is very error prone. Also if you need to maintain your list, you will need to make code changes, recompile, redeploy.

share|improve this answer

If you read all your passwords into a List, since each match is executing the same code why not just loop them like so

List<String> passwords = new ArrayList<String>();
// read in your passwords... from a file?
for(String s : passwords)
{
     if(test.matches(".*?\\b" + s + "\\b.*?"))
     {
          scarlet += 1;
     }

}
share|improve this answer
    
I just edited the original post, I used pretty much what you posted and it helped alot! However, once I got it to read off, it always comes out as either 0, or if i do a for loops such as (x = 0; x <=10; x++) it comes out as 11 (for example.) –  user3221458 Jan 23 '14 at 23:53
    
Check your regex by printing out the pattern and the string you are matching and test it on a regex site such as RegexPlanet. Also if you use the for loop like you have posted you need to use passwords.get(x) –  Java Devil Jan 24 '14 at 0:59

I know this might sound too simple, but just checking... lets say you have two lists of strings and you want to check if any string from one list matches a string from another list, have you tried searching by brute force!

//List<String> testwords = your list of test words
//List<String> passwords = your list of passwords

    for(String test: testwords) {
        for(String password: passwords) {
            if(test!=null && test.equals(password)) {
                scarlet++;
            }
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

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