Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a program in c++ that uses c sockets. I need a function to receive data that I would like to return a string. I know this will not work:

std::string Communication::recv(int bytes) {
    std::string output;
    if (read(this->sock, output, bytes)<0) {
        std::cerr << "Failed to read data from socket.\n";
    }
    return output;
}

Because the read()* function takes a char array pointer for an argument. What is the best way to return a string here? I know I could theoretically read the data into a char array then convert that to a string but that seems wasteful to me. Is there a better way?

*I don't actually mind using something other that read() if there is a more fitting alternative

Here is all of the code on pastebin which should expire in a week. If I don't have an answer by then I will re-post it: http://pastebin.com/HkTDzmSt

[UPDATE]

I also tried using &output[0] but got the output contained the following:

jello!
[insert a billion bell characters here]

"jello!" was the data sent back to the socket.

share|improve this question
1  
c_str() is const, you can't do it. just read into a buffer then copy to a string. –  billz Jan 22 '14 at 2:29
    
@billz Correct, I retract my suggestion. –  Borgleader Jan 22 '14 at 2:31
    
Is this even proper form? If not is there something I should do differently? –  735Tesla Jan 22 '14 at 2:32
    
@billz &output[0] might work though. A bit sketchy but it avoids a mem copy. –  Eric Fortin Jan 22 '14 at 2:32
1  
output[0] returns a reference to the first character. You need a pointer for the socket to write in so you take the address of that reference. You can do it since character in the string are contiguous in memory. &output would point to the string object and not a buffer you could write in. –  Eric Fortin Jan 22 '14 at 2:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here are some functions that should help you accomplish what you want. It assumes you'll only receive ascii character from the other end of the socket.

std::string Communication::recv(int bytes) {
    std::string output(bytes, 0);
    if (read(this->sock, &output[0], bytes-1)<0) {
        std::cerr << "Failed to read data from socket.\n";
    }
    return output;
}

or

std::string Communication::recv(int bytes) {
    std::string output;
    output.resize(bytes);

    int bytes_received = read(this->sock, &output[0], bytes-1);
    if (bytes_received<0) {
        std::cerr << "Failed to read data from socket.\n";
        return "";
    }

    output[bytes_received] = 0;
    return output;
}

When printing the string, be sure to use cout << output.c_str() since string overwrite operator<< and skip unprintable character until it reaches size. Ultimately, you could also resize at the end of the function to the size received and be able to use normal cout.

As pointed out in comments, sending the size first would also be a great idea to avoid possible unnecessary memory allocation by the string class.

share|improve this answer
    
I still get the same output I linked in my last comment. The interesting thing is that it appears that the bell characters are about equal to the length of "jello!" subtracted from 1024 (the parameter I am currently using as bytes) –  735Tesla Jan 22 '14 at 2:53
    
If this helps I posted all of my code on pastebin: pastebin.com/HkTDzmSt –  735Tesla Jan 22 '14 at 3:00
1  
@735Tesla You should send the length of your string first. Then when receiving, you read that length first to know how much to read next. By using a fixed length for receive, you will be waiting for nothing and/or reading garbage into your string. –  François Moisan Jan 22 '14 at 3:03
    
@FrançoisMoisan Thanks. I hadn't though of doing that. Is there still a way to dynamically receive input though? –  735Tesla Jan 22 '14 at 3:05
1  
@735Tesla Done. –  Eric Fortin Jan 22 '14 at 3:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.