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OK, I'm doing a few experiments with Lex/Bison(Yacc), and given that my C skills are rather rusty (I've once created compilers and stuff with all these tools and now I'm lost in the first few lines... :-S), I need your help.

This is what my Parser looks like :

%{
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

void yyerror(const char *str)
{
    fprintf(stderr,"error: %s\n",str);
}

int yywrap()
{
    return 1;
} 

main()
{
    yyparse();
} 

%}

%union 
{
    char* str;
}

%token <str> WHAT IS FIND GET SHOW WITH POSS OF NUMBER WORD

%type <str> statement
%start statements
%%

statement
    : GET { printf("get\n"); }
    | SHOW  { printf("%s\n",$1); }
    | OF { printf("of\n"); }
    ;

statements
    : statement
    | statements statement
    ;

The Issue :

So, basically, whenever the parser comes across a "get", it prints "get". And so on.

However, when trying to print "show" (using the $1 specifier) it gives out a segmentation fault error.

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question

Lex returns a number representing the token, you need to access yytext to get the text of what is parsed.

something like

statement               : GET { printf("get\n"); }
                        | SHOW  { printf("%s\n",yytext); }
                        | OF { printf("of\n"); }
                        ;

to propogate the text of terminals, I go ahead associate a nonterminal with a terminal and pass back the char* and start building the parse tree for example. Note I've left out the type decl and the implementation of create_sww_ASTNode(char*,char*,char*); However, importantly not all nonterminals will return the same type, for number is an integer, word return char* sww return astNode (or whatever generic abstract syntax tree structure you come up with). Usually beyond the nonterminal representing terminals, it's all AST stuff.

sww                     : show word word
                        {
                           $$ = create_sww_ASTNode($1,$2,$3);
                        }
                        ;

word                    : WORD
                        { 
                          $$ = malloc(strlen(yytext) + 1);
                          strcpy($$,yytext);
                        }
                        ;

show                    : SHOW
                        { 
                          $$ = malloc(strlen(yytext) + 1);
                          strcpy($$,yytext);
                        }
                        ;

number                  : NUMBER
                        { 
                           $$ = atoi(yytext);
                        }
                        ;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your reply! (I'm actually writing an answer myself, at this very moment) WHat if there are more than one tokens and need - let's say the 2nd one? Like : SHOW WORD WORD { printf("%s\n",$2); – Dr.Kameleon Jan 22 '14 at 4:10
    
I'll update to show what to do (or at least what I do) for multiple tokens.... – waTeim Jan 22 '14 at 4:12
    
I've posted my approach and waiting for yours. Let's see what we can get out of it! Thanks again, my friend! ;-) – Dr.Kameleon Jan 22 '14 at 4:14
2  
-1 You can never reliably access yytext directly in the parser, as the parser may read ahead a token, so you don't know which token you'll get, or what state the buffer will be in. Instead, you need to copy the data out of yytext in the lexer code, storing it into yylval for the parser to access. – Chris Dodd Jan 22 '14 at 4:28
    
Never? I wonder. Maybe this works so long as you never access yytext in the parser except when it equates to exactly 1 token. After all the production nonterm ::== terminal will always be a reduce. – waTeim Jan 22 '14 at 4:39

You don't show your lexer code, but the problem is probably that you never set yylval to anything, so when you access $1 in the parser, it contains garbage and you get a crash. Your lexer actions need to set yylval.str to something so it will be valid:

"show"   { yylval.str = "SHOW"; return SHOW }
[a-z]+   { yylval.str = strdup(yytext); return WORD; }
share|improve this answer
    
Please have a look at my own answer. And yep, the trick was something along the lines of your approach... :) – Dr.Kameleon Jan 22 '14 at 6:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

OK, so here's the answer (Can somebody tell me what it is that I always come up with the solution once I've already published a question here in SO? lol!)

The problem was not with the parser itself, but actually with the Lexer.

The thing is : when you tell it to { printf("%s\n",$1); }, we actually tell it to print yylval (which is by default an int, not a string).

So, the trick is to convert the appropriate tokens into strings.

Here's my (updated) Lexer file :

%{
#include <stdio.h>
#include "parser.tab.h"

void toStr();
%}

DIGIT               [0-9]
LETTER              [a-zA-Z]
LETTER_OR_SPACE     [a-zA-Z ]

%%

find    { toStr(); return FIND; }
get     { toStr(); return GET; }
show    { toStr(); return SHOW; }

{DIGIT}+(\.{DIGIT}+)?   { toStr(); return NUMBER; }
{LETTER}+               { toStr(); return WORD; }
\n                      /* ignore end of line */;
[ \t]+                  /* ignore whitespace */;
%%

void toStr()
{
    yylval.str=strdup(yytext);
}
share|improve this answer

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