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I'm on Linux; looking at the STL headers; they're really really complicated.

Is there, somewhere, a smaller version of STL that has the core features of the STL, but is actually readable?

Thanks!

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Why do you need it to be readable? You're not supposed to need to read the source code. It is documented so you can use the library without having to read the specific implementation –  jalf Jan 24 '10 at 15:55
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I'm writing some templates of my own. I want to understand how the STL is implemented to learn from their tradeoffs. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 15:57
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@jalf » It's often worth it to peek under the covers for educational purposes. Not every look inside a black box is for sneaky encapsulation-breaking reasons. :) –  John Feminella Jan 24 '10 at 15:58
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@John: But most of them are. Anyway, there is little to learn from it. STL code is not designed to be 1) nice, or 2) portable. It is typically designed for specific compilers and platforms, which means it can get away with all the implementation-specific hacks that your own code should not rely on. There is plenty to learn from the STL, but you learn it from the interface and the documentation and the underlying design, not the implementation. –  jalf Jan 24 '10 at 16:02
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@280Z28 There is no "the implementation of the STL". –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 17:24
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9 Answers

up vote 19 down vote accepted

There is a book The C++ Standard Template Library, co-authored by the original STL designers Stepanov & Lee (together with P.J. Plauger and David Musser), which describes a possible implementation, complete with code - see http://www.amazon.co.uk/C-Standard-Template-Library/dp/0134376331.

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I use the The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference and can highly recommend it. Of course it is not something you read cover-to-cover, but is an very handy reference. Check out the reviews on Amazon as well.

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+1: This book is awesome. –  280Z28 Jan 24 '10 at 17:07
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A great book, but one that does not address the question. –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 17:16
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For a more recent and thorough explanation of the "rules" of STL (such as iterators), check out a new book co-authored by Stepanov: http://www.elementsofprogramming.com/

If you enjoy mathematics, this book will excite you, because what the authors describe is essentially an algebra of computation. The site includes a sample chapter.

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Note that GCC's STL headers have the tab stop set to eight. Reconfigure your editor or replace tabs with eight spaces and it should be much more readable.

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Well, the STL is pretty complicated, so I think there's a certain amount of essential complexity going on here. It's not surprising that it may seem a little bewildering at first glance.

That said, maybe you could check out Borland's STLport and see if you find that an easier read.

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Note, STLport is not a product by Borland. STLport is implemenation based on original SGI STL version. Borland just switched to STLport with in BCB6, but it does not maintain or own STLport project. –  mloskot Jan 24 '10 at 16:23
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The STL is a highly optimized library that does most of what it does by cleverly exploiting advanced features of C++ and the underlying compiler. Additionally, many things are inlined so there is no real bunch of code to look at like in an application. I'd recommend following Neil's advice.

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Two key points stand out:

  1. No implementation of the STL is readable without an understanding of the goals, rationale, benefits and limitations of the language itself, and general approach.
  2. Most implementations are readable once you have a deep understanding of (1) because the code is self-documenting on those premises. You might not like the formatting, but that really should be the least of your problems.

As a side note, you might have more success with the MSVC version because it's not trying to target multiple as many compilers. Compiler bugs and implementation-defined behavior result in various subtle workarounds. As those workarounds grow in number (as certainly happens when you add more compilers), the code can get gross fast.

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RDESTL provides a 'small subset of STL functionality' (but also has some extras). I personally found the code quite instructive and easier to navigate than the big guys like STLPort or Dinkumware's implementation that ships with VC++.

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Yes, there is original implementation of the STL by Alexander Stepanov and Meng Lee. It is the most readable STL implementation I have ever seen. You can download it from here.

Below is an implementation of pair. Note how readable the source code really was:

#include <bool.h>

template <class T1, class T2>
struct pair {
    T1 first;
    T2 second;
    pair() {}
    pair(const T1& a, const T2& b) : first(a), second(b) {}
};

template <class T1, class T2>
inline bool operator==(const pair<T1, T2>& x, const pair<T1, T2>& y) { 
    return x.first == y.first && x.second == y.second; 
}

template <class T1, class T2>
inline bool operator<(const pair<T1, T2>& x, const pair<T1, T2>& y) { 
    return x.first < y.first || (!(y.first < x.first) && x.second < y.second); 
}

template <class T1, class T2>
inline pair<T1, T2> make_pair(const T1& x, const T2& y) {
    return pair<T1, T2>(x, y);
}

Back to the roots!

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