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I would like to count how many m by n matrices whose elements are 1 or -1 have the property that all its floor(m/2)+1 by n submatrices have full rank. My current method is naive and slow and is in the following python/numpy code. It simply iterates over all matrices and tests all the submatrices.

import numpy as np
import itertools
from scipy.misc import comb

m = 8
n = 4

rowstochoose = int(np.floor(m/2)+1)

maxnumber = comb(m, rowstochoose, exact = True)

matrix_g=(np.array(x).reshape(m,n) for x in itertools.product([-1,1], repeat = m*n))

nofound = 0
for A in matrix_g:
    count = 0
    for rows in itertools.combinations(range(m), int(rowstochoose)):
       if (np.linalg.matrix_rank(A[list(rows)]) == int(min(n,rowstochoose))):
           count+=1
       else:
           break
    if (count == maxnumber):
         nofound+=1   
print nofound, 2**(m*n)

Is there a better/faster way to do this? I would like to do this calculation for n and m up to 20 but any significant improvements would be great.

Context. I am interested in getting some exact solutions for http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/640780/probability-that-every-vector-is-not-orthogonal-to-half-of-the-others .


As a data point to compare implementations. n,m = 4,4 should output 26880 . n,m=5,5 is too slow for me to run. For n = 2 and m = 2,3,4,5,6 the outputs should be 8, 0, 96, 0, 1280.


Current status Feb 2, 2014:

  • The answer of leewangzhong is fast but is not correct for m > n . leewangzhong is considering how to fix it.
  • The answer of Hooked does not run for m > n .
share|improve this question
    
@Teepeemm Good point. Thank you. –  marshall Jan 22 '14 at 13:51
1  
Earlier you said you needed this for a simulation; that does not make any sense to me, but regardless, we might get to the core of the issue faster if you told us a little more about what it is you are actually trying to achieve. –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Jan 22 '14 at 15:01
    
Note that matrix rank, and pairs of rows summing to the same value, are not the same thing. Not that I mind; they are all interesting problems to me. But if it is the former you are actually interested in, you could have saved yourself a lot of time by giving some more context. –  Eelco Hoogendoorn Jan 22 '14 at 15:06
    
@EelcoHoogendoorn This question is completely unrelated to any other question I have asked in SO. I have added some context to the question. –  marshall Jan 22 '14 at 17:28
1  
Shouldn't you be comparing the rank to min(n, rowstochoose)? The largest possible rank of a JxK matrix is min(J, K), and I assume that's what you mean by "full rank". –  Tim Peters Jan 25 '14 at 6:01

4 Answers 4

(Now a partial solution for n = m//2+1, and the requested code.)

Let k := m//2+1

This is somewhat equivalent to asking, "How many collections of m n-dimensional vectors of {-1,1} have no linearly dependent sets of size min(k,n)?"

For those matrices, we know or can assume:

  • The first entry of every vector is 1 (if not, multiply the whole by -1). This reduces the count by a factor of 2**m.
  • All vectors in the list are distinct (if not, any submatrix with two identical vectors has non-full rank). This eliminates a lot. There are choose(2**m,n) matrices of distinct vectors.
  • The list of vectors are sorted lexicographically (rank isn't affected by permutations). So we're really thinking about sets of vectors instead of lists. This reduces the count by a factor of m! (because we require distinctness).

With this, we have a solution for n=4, m=8. There are only eight different vectors with the property that the first entry is positive. There is only one combination (sorted list) of 8 distinct vectors from 8 distinct vectors.

array([[ 1,  1,  1,  1],
       [ 1,  1,  1, -1],
       [ 1,  1, -1,  1],
       [ 1,  1, -1, -1],
       [ 1, -1,  1,  1],
       [ 1, -1,  1, -1],
       [ 1, -1, -1,  1],
       [ 1, -1, -1, -1]], dtype=int8)

100 size-4 combinations from this list have rank 3. So there are 0 matrices with the property.


For a more general solution:

Note that there are 2**(n-1) vectors with first coordinate -1, and choose(2**(n-1),m) matrices to inspect. For n=8 and m=8, there are 128 vectors, and 1.4297027e+12 matrices. It might help to answer, "For i=1,...,k, how many combinations have rank i?"

Alternatively, "What kind of matrices (with the above assumptions) have less than full rank?" And I think the answer is exactly, A sufficient condition is, "Two columns are multiples of each other". I have a feeling that this is true, and I tested this for all 4x4, 5x5, and 6x6 matrices.(Must've screwed up the tests) Since the first column was chosen to be homogeneous, and since all homogeneous vectors are multiples of each other, any submatrix of size k with a homogeneous column other than the first column will have rank less than k.

This is not a necessary condition, though. The following matrix is singular (first plus fourth is equal to third plus second).

array([[ 1,  1,  1,  1,  1],
       [ 1,  1,  1,  1, -1],
       [ 1,  1, -1, -1,  1],
       [ 1,  1, -1, -1, -1],
       [ 1, -1,  1, -1,  1]], dtype=int8)

Since there are only two possible values (-1 and 1), all mxn matrices where m>2, k := m//2+1, n = k and with first column -1 have a majority member in each column (i.e. at least k members are the same). So for n=k, the answer is 0.


For n<=8, here's code to generate the vectors.

from numpy import unpackbits, arange, uint8, int8

#all distinct n-length vectors from -1,1 with first entry -1
def nvectors(n):
    if n > 8:
        raise ValueError #is that the right error?
    return -1 + 2 * (
        #explode binary numbers to arrays of 8 zeroes and ones
        unpackbits(arange(2**(n-1),dtype=uint8)) #unpackbits only takes uint
            .reshape((-1,8)) #unpackbits flattens, so we need to shape it to 8 bits
            [:,-n:] #only take the last n bytes
            .view(int8) #need signed
    )

Matrix generator:

#generate all length-m matrices that are combinations of distinct n-vectors
def matrix_g(n,m):
    return (array(mat) for mat in combinations(nvectors(n),m))

The following is a function to check that all submatrices of length maxrank have full rank. It stops if any have less than maxrank, instead of checking all combinations.

rankof = np.linalg.matrix_rank
#all submatrices of at least half size have maxrank
#(we only need to check the maxrank-sized matrices)
def halfrank(matrix,maxrank):
return all(rankof(submatr) == maxrank for submatr in combinations(matrix,maxrank))

Generate all matrices that have all half-matrices with full rank def nicematrices(m,n): maxrank = min(m//2+1,n) return (matr for matr in matrix_g(n,m) if halfrank(matr,maxrank))

Putting it all together:

import numpy as np
from numpy import unpackbits, arange, uint8, int8, array
from itertools import combinations

#all distinct n-length vectors from -1,1 with first entry -1
def nvectors(n):
    if n > 8:
        raise ValueError #is that the right error?
    if n==0:
        return array([])
    return -1 + 2 * (
        #explode binary numbers to arrays of 8 zeroes and ones
        unpackbits(arange(2**(n-1),dtype=uint8)) #unpackbits only takes uint
            .reshape((-1,8)) #unpackbits flattens, so we need to shape it to 8 bits
            [:,-n:] #only take the last n bytes
            .view(int8) #need signed
    )

#generate all length-m matrices that are combinations of distinct n-vectors
def matrix_g(n,m):
    return (array(mat) for mat in combinations(nvectors(n),m))

rankof = np.linalg.matrix_rank
#all submatrices of at least half size have maxrank
#(we only need to check the maxrank-sized matrices)
def halfrank(matrix,maxrank):
    return all(rankof(submatr) == maxrank for submatr in combinations(matrix,maxrank))

#generate all matrices that have all half-matrices with full rank
def nicematrices(m,n):
    maxrank = min(m//2+1,n)
    return (matr for matr in matrix_g(n,m) if halfrank(matr,maxrank))

#returns (number of nice matrices, number of all matrices)
def count_nicematrices(m,n):
    from math import factorial
    return (len(list(nicematrices(m,n)))*factorial(m)*2**m, 2**(m*n))

for i in range(0,6):
    print (i, count_nicematrices(i,i))

count_nicematrices(5,5) takes about 15 seconds for me, the vast majority of which is taken by the matrix_rank function.

share|improve this answer
    
I removed this line about the 8x4 case: "This matrix has full rank, so every submatrix must have full rank." This is false. –  leewangzhong Jan 30 '14 at 18:33
    
Solved for n >= m//2+1. –  leewangzhong Jan 30 '14 at 20:28
    
What do you get for n,m = 5,5? –  marshall Jan 30 '14 at 20:41
    
Bleh. Hold up, I did something very wrong. –  leewangzhong Jan 30 '14 at 20:46
    
4,4: 26880. 5,5: 16773120. 6,6: 41757327360. So obviously my answer is wrong right now. –  leewangzhong Jan 30 '14 at 21:00

Since no one's answered yet, here's an answer without code. The useful symmetries that I see are as follows.

  1. Multiply a row by -1.
  2. Multiply a column by -1.
  3. Permute the rows.
  4. Permute the columns.

I would attack this problem by exhaustively generating the non-isomorphs, filtering them, and summing the sizes of their orbits. nauty will be quite useful for the first and third steps. Assuming that most matrices have few symmetries (undoubtedly an excellent assumption for n large, but it's not obvious a priori how large), I would expect 8x8 to be doable, 9x9 to be borderline, and 10x10 to be out of reach.

Expanded pseudocode:

  1. Generate one representative of each orbit of the (m - 1) by (n - 1) 0-1 matrices acted upon by the group generated by row and column permutations, together with the size of the orbit (= (m - 1)! (n - 1)! / the size of the automorphism group). Perhaps the author of the paper that Tim linked would be willing to share his code; otherwise, see below.

  2. For each matrix, replace entries x by (-1)^x. Add one row and one column of 1s. Multiply the size of its orbit by 2^(m + n - 1). This takes care of the sign change symmetries.

  3. Filter the matrices and sum the orbit sizes of the ones that remain. You might save a little computation time here by implementing Gram--Schmidt yourself so that when you try all combinations in lexicographic order there's an opportunity to reuse partial results for the shared prefixes.

Isomorph-free enumeration:

McKay's template can be used to generate the representatives for (m + 1) by n 0-1 matrices from the representatives for m by n 0-1 matrices, in a manner amenable to depth-first search. With each m by n 0-1 matrix, associate a bipartite graph with m black vertices, n white vertices, and the appropriate edge for each 1 entry. Do the following for each m by n representative.

  1. For each length-n vector, construct the graph for the (m + 1) by n matrix consisting of the representative together with the new vector and run nauty to get a canonical labeling and the vertex orbits.

  2. Filter out the possibilities where the vertex corresponding to the new vector is in a different orbit from the black vertex with the lowest number.

  3. Filter out the possibilities with duplicate canonical labelings.

nauty also computes the orders of automorphism groups.

share|improve this answer
1  
For contrast, Classification of small (0,1) matrices details algorithms used for the "simpler" (smaller search space) task of classifying (0,1) NxN matrices in various ways. 8x8 was doable for the author, but required a month of computation spread across 5 PCs; he estimates that completing 9x9 would take 1000 times longer. Then again, the classifications he did look harder than this one. In any case, this isn't really a programming question - what's really needed here is deep analysis. –  Tim Peters Jan 27 '14 at 20:28
    
@TimPeters Flipping signs effectively gives us one row and one column for "free", so the 8x8 case of this problem corresponds to the 7x7 case of that one. –  David Eisenstat Jan 27 '14 at 22:36
    
OTOH, the number of nonsingular NxN {-1, 1} matrices is 2**(2*N-1) times the number of nonsingular (N-1)x(N-1) {0, 1} matrices. No matter how you slice this, there are "lots" of 'em ;-) See "Number of nonsingular n X n (-1,1)-matrices.". –  Tim Peters Jan 27 '14 at 22:50
    
Thank you for your answer. Could you possibly expand the pseudocode so that someone can try to see how to implement your idea? –  marshall Jan 28 '14 at 10:11
1  
@marshall Expanded as much as I have time to right now. This is a bit tricky to implement, but it works for this question, your other one, and other ones besides that you may have in the future. –  David Eisenstat Jan 28 '14 at 16:29

You will need to rethink this problem from a mathematical point of view. That said even with brute force, there are some programming tricks you can use to speed up the process (as SO is a programming site). Little tricks like not recalculating int(min(n,rowstochoose)) and itertools.combinations(range(m), int(rowstochoose)) can save a few percent - but the real gain comes from memoization. Others have mentioned it, but I thought it might be useful to have a complete, working, code example:

import numpy as np
from scipy.misc import comb
import itertools, hashlib

m,n = 4,4

rowstochoose = int(np.floor(m/2)+1)
maxnumber    = comb(m, rowstochoose, exact = True)
combo_itr    = (x for x in itertools.product([-1,1], repeat = m*n))
matrix_itr   = (np.array(x,dtype=np.int8).reshape((n,m)) for x in combo_itr)

sub_shapes = map(list,(itertools.combinations(range(m), int(rowstochoose))))
required_rank = int(min(n,rowstochoose))

memo = {}

no_found = 0
for A in matrix_itr:
    check = True
    for s in sub_shapes:
        view  = A[s].view(np.int8)
        h    = hashlib.sha1(view).hexdigest()

        if h not in memo: 
            memo[h] =  np.linalg.matrix_rank(view)

        if memo[h] != required_rank:
            check = False
            break
    if check: no_found+=1   

print no_found, 2**(m*n)

This gives a speed gain of almost 10x for the 4x4 case - you'll see substantial improvements for larger matrices if you care to wait long enough. It's possible for the larger matrices, where the cost of the rank is proportionally more expensive, that you can order the matrices ahead of time on the hashing:

idx  = np.lexsort(view.T)
h    = hashlib.sha1(view[idx]).hexdigest()

For the 4x4 case this makes it slightly worse, but I expect that to reverse for the 5x5 case.

share|improve this answer
    
Normally replacing linalg.matrix_rank by linalg.det would make a significant different too as it is much faster to calculate the determinant than the rank of a matrix. However I don't see how to do that here. –  marshall Jan 30 '14 at 20:19
    
@marshall That requires you to have a square matrix - this is not true in general for your problem. –  Hooked Jan 30 '14 at 20:19
1  
@marshall Your best bet so far looks like a combination of memoization and the reduced matrix set generated by leewangzhong's answer. –  Hooked Jan 30 '14 at 20:20
    
Would it be hard to make your code work for m > n ? –  marshall Jan 31 '14 at 10:06

Algorithm 1 - memorizing small ones

I would use memorizing of the already checked smaller matrices.

You could simply write down in binary format (0 for -1, 1 for 1) all smaller matrices. BTW, you cane directly check for ranges matrices of (0 and 1) instead of (-1 and 1) - it is the same. Let us call these coding IMAGES. Using long types you can have matrices of up to 64 cells, so, up to 8x8. It is fast. Using String you can them have as large as you need. Really, 8x8 is more than enough - in the 8GB memory we can place 1G longs. it is about 2^30, so, you can remember matrices of about up to 25-28 elements.

For every size you'll have a set of images:

for 2x2: 1001, 0110, 1000, 0100, 0010, 0001, 0111, 1011, 1101, 1110.

So, you'll have archive=array of NxN, each element of which will be an ordered list of binary images of good matrices. - (for matrix size MxN, where M>=N, the appropriate place in archive will have coordinates M,N. If M

  • When you are checking a new large matrix, divide it into small ones
  • For every small matrix T
    • If the appropriate place in the archive for size of T has no list, create it and fill by images of all full-rank matrices of size of T and order images. If you are out of memory, stop the process of archive filling.
    • If T could be in archive, according to size:
      • Make image of T
      • Look for image(t) in the list - if it is in it, it is OK, if no, the large matrix should be thrown off.
    • If T is too big for the archive, check it as you do it.

Algorithm 2 - increasing sizes

The other possibility is to create larger matrices by adding pieces to the lesser ones, already found. You should decide, up to what size the matrices will grow.

When you find a "correct" matrix of size MxN, try to add a row to top it. New matrices should be checked only for submatrices that include the new row. The same with the new column.

You should set exact algorithm, which sizes are derived from which ones. Thus you can minimize the number of remembered matrices. I thought about that sequence:

  • Start from 2x2 matrices.
  • continue with 3x2
  • 4x2, 3x3
  • 5x2, 4x3
  • 6x2, 5x3, 4x4
  • 7x2, 6x3, 5x4
  • ...

So you can remember only (M+N)/2-1 matrices for searching among sizes MxN.

If each time when we can create new size from two old ones, we derive from more square ones, we could also greatly spare place for matrices remembering: For "long" matrices as 7x2 we do need remember and check only the last line 1x2. For matrices 6x3 we should remember their stub of 2x3, and so on.

Also, you don't need to remember the largest matrices - you won't use them for further counting.

Again use "images" for remembering the matrix.

share|improve this answer
    
I find this answer a little confusing. If you could you show some code that works for small n and m explicitly then I can test it to see if it gives the answers I am expecting. –  marshall Jan 28 '14 at 19:26

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