Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This is probably a silly question, but I can't see what I am doing wrong here. I have the class:

#include <sys/time.h>
#include <gsl/gsl_cdf.h>
#include <gsl/gsl_randist.h>
#include <cmath>
#include "randomnumbergenerator.h"

class RandomNumberGenerator
{
    gsl_rng * rn;
public:
    RandomNumberGenerator();
    ~RandomNumberGenerator();
    double univariate();
    void bivariateGaussian(double rho, double &x, double &y);
};

long currentMicroseconds()
{
    struct timeval now;
    gettimeofday(&now, NULL);
    return now.tv_usec;
}

RandomNumberGenerator::RandomNumberGenerator()
{
    const gsl_rng_type * T;


    gsl_rng_env_setup();

    //T = gsl_rng_default;
    T = gsl_rng_mt19937;
    rn = gsl_rng_alloc (T);
    gsl_rng_set(rn,currentMicroseconds());
}

double RandomNumberGenerator::univariate()
{
    return gsl_rng_uniform(rn);
}

void RandomNumberGenerator::bivariateGaussian(double rho, double &x, double &y)
{
    gsl_ran_bivariate_gaussian (rn, 1.0, 1.0, rho, &x, &y);
}

RandomNumberGenerator::~RandomNumberGenerator()
{
    gsl_rng_free (rn);
}

Which I call from here:

double x;
double y;
rng.bivariateGaussian(rho, x, y);

but I get a segmentation fault on gsl_ran_bivariate_gaussian (rn, 1.0, 1.0, rho, &x, &y);

Any idea?

share|improve this question
    
@Grzenio, Another suggestion is to try compiling with -O0 to turn of all optimization. –  Omnifarious Jan 24 '10 at 20:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

check to see if rn has really been allocated. It is probably the only thing that can cause segmentation fault.

i tested your code on my computer, it runs okay as far as they can tell. May be check installation of GSL, they have a test suite you can use

share|improve this answer

thanks everyone for your answers. The bug was in the piece of code that I didn't paste :( I was passing an instance of RandomNumberGenerator as a normal parameter. When I changed it to passing as reference it started to work magically.

share|improve this answer
2  
It's not magic. gsl_rng_free (rn); frees the gsl structure. The default copy constructor just makes a copy of the pointer. It doesn't allocate a new gsl constructor and you haven't defined your own copy constructor. You should inherit from ::bost::noncopyable if you have boost, or declare your RandomNumberGenerator to have a private copy constructor and assignment operator. –  Omnifarious Jan 24 '10 at 22:16
    
Cheers for clarification @Omnifarious, I will do that! Its kind of hard to get your head around C++ after spending a couple of years in C# :) –  Grzenio Jan 25 '10 at 9:29

Which compiler? I assume that rn is a member variable of RandomNumberGenerator. Do you initialize it to 0 in the constructor? You don't seem to be checking for an error return from gsl_rng_alloc, you probably should be because the only thing I can see right off that may be causing a problem is if rn isn't pointing to anything valid at the call that's segfaulting.

Looking at the manual for gsl_rng_alloc you can check to see if it returns NULL or 0 and then throw an exception if it doesn't. For example:

#include <stdexcept>

RandomNumberGenerator::RandomNumberGenerator()
{
    const gsl_rng_type * T;


    gsl_rng_env_setup();

    //T = gsl_rng_default;
    T = gsl_rng_mt19937;
    rn = gsl_rng_alloc (T);
    if (rn == 0) {
        throw ::std::runtime_error("Failed to allocation a random number generator.");
    }
    gsl_rng_set(rn,currentMicroseconds());
}

Also, have you tried compiling with -O0 to turn of all optimization?

share|improve this answer
    
Pasted the .h file. I am using g++ (one of the latest versions) on Linux. What is the best way to check if rn is allocated (and how to handle if its not)? –  Grzenio Jan 24 '10 at 19:35
    
@Grzenio, I'm not seeing the .h file. –  Omnifarious Jan 24 '10 at 19:41
    
I just merged it just after the #includes –  Grzenio Jan 24 '10 at 20:09
    
@Grzenio, I see it. And I've modified my answer a bit to answer your question and suggest a couple of other possibilities. –  Omnifarious Jan 24 '10 at 20:15
    
I added your condition, but rn seems to be allocated ok. Only when I first use it in a function other than the constructor it fails. I wonder if the fact that the library I am using (GSL) is C and not C++ has anything to do with this error (because it works fine if I dump all the code to main) –  Grzenio Jan 24 '10 at 21:04

I don't program c++, but C. Hopefully this will someway also apply to you. But on C I sometimes use a debugger like GDB or the debugger in Eclipse. I also use valgrind(I really like this tool a lot) to fix memory leaks/segmentation faults. I advice you to like at this tutorial to get a better understanding of what valgrind can do for you. Valgrind can do a lot more so I would advice you to read about valgrind/helgrind.

share|improve this answer

In:

double x;
double y;
rng.bivariateGaussian(rho, x, y);

are x and y perhaps supposed to be arrays rather than single variables? I'd expect a distribution to produce N values rather than one (or two).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry for a messy question: rng is the RandomNumberGenerator (defined above). gsl_ran_bivariate_gaussian is defined here: gnu.org/software/gsl/manual/html_node/… –  Grzenio Jan 24 '10 at 20:11
    
@Grzenio Yes, but are you expecting a single pair of doubles, or two arrays of doubles (for those of us who don't know what the term 'variate' means - that wasn't the most helpful manual entry I've seen) –  anon Jan 24 '10 at 20:20
    
@Neil Butterworth, the manual entry says it generates a pair of gaussians, so I don't think it wants arrays. –  Omnifarious Jan 24 '10 at 20:28
    
I am expecting only 2 doubles –  Grzenio Jan 24 '10 at 20:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.