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Could anyone explain the difference between filter and filter_by functions in SQLAlchemy? I am confused and can't really see the difference. Which one should I be using?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 75 down vote accepted

filter_by is used for simple queries on the column names like

db.users.filter_by(name='Joe')

The same can be accomplished with filter by writing

db.users.filter(db.users.name=='Joe')

but you can also write more powerful queries containing expressions like

db.users.filter(or_(db.users.name=='Ryan', db.users.country=='England'))

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great! now i know the difference! thank you! –  bodacydo Jan 24 '10 at 20:05
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How does this work under the hood? Would not db.users.name=='Ryan' evaluate once to a constant and then be meaningless from then on? It seems like one would need to use a lambda for this to work. –  Hamish Grubijan Feb 27 '13 at 23:11
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the equality operator is overloaded –  Daniel Velkov Feb 27 '13 at 23:12

We actually had these merged together originally, i.e. there was a "filter"-like method that accepted *args and **kwargs, where you could pass a SQL expression or keyword arguments (or both). I actually find that a lot more convenient, but people were always confused by it, since they're usually still getting over the difference between column == expression and keyword = expression. So we split them up.

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I think your point about column == expression vs. keyword = expression is the key point to make about the difference between filter and filter_by. Thanks! –  Hollister Dec 12 '10 at 18:03

filter_by uses keyword arguments, whereas filter allows pythonic filtering arguments like filter(User.name=="john")

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thanks for the answer! –  bodacydo Jan 24 '10 at 20:09
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Hmm. Wouldn't the latter one be filter(User.name=="john") ? –  Matthew Schinckel Feb 2 '10 at 23:03
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@Matthew: Correct. Thanks. –  Johannes Charra Feb 3 '10 at 7:45

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