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Consider this code, which extends the Array .NET type :

Public Module ArrayExtensions
    <System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension>
    Public Iterator Function ToEnumerable(Of T)(target As Array) As IEnumerable(Of T)
        For Each item In target
            Yield DirectCast(item, T)
        Next
    End Function
End Module

I use it to get a structure which the Min() and Max() extension methods will take. The arrays often run to several million elements in three dimensions, e.g. an array T(,,) is common.

EDIT: Specifically, this function comes into play with a line of code that looks like this:

    Return loadedData(rType).dataArray.ToEnumerable(Of Single).Min

where dataarray is (in this case) a value item in the ConcurrentDictionary loadedData and is of type Single(,,)

Without the ToEnumerable as currently written, there is no IEnumerable interface for the Max() extension function to hook to.

What would it take to "parallelize" this function? No form of Parallel.For that I've tried seems to work, because the loadedData array is not recognized as an IEnumerable type. (Is this because a Single(,,) is processed as a value type, perhaps?)

(No answer has to use VB. C# is also fine!)

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2  
In my opinion you don't need this method at all. You can use Cast. It seems you re-invented Cast method –  Sriram Sakthivel Jan 22 at 14:46
    
I might have, but that's not the question. The question is: How to parallelize? –  Rob Perkins Jan 22 at 14:55
    
So you want to parallelize this without using Paralell API is it? –  Sriram Sakthivel Jan 22 at 14:59
    
@RobPerkins, how about ParallelEnumerable.Cast<TResult> ? –  Thomas Levesque Jan 22 at 15:09
1  
@RobPerkins, no, but you can make it parallel with AsParallel()... Your code would become target.AsParallel().Cast<T>() –  Thomas Levesque Jan 22 at 15:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since you already have IEnumerable<T>, you can use AsParallel() on that (e.g. dataArray.ToEnumerable().AsParallel().Min()). But the IEnumerable interface is inherently serial, you can parallelize processing its elements, but not iterating it. This means that for very simpler operations like Min(), such parallelization doesn't make much sense.

What could make sense here would be to parallelize the iteration too. This is possible, because you can access particular items of the array using the indexer.

I tried to do this using a custom partitioner, but the results were worse than the serial version. The problem is that the overhead of each iteration has to be as small as possible and that's hard to do directly using partitioners.

Instead, what you could do is to partition only the first dimension of your array (assuming you can be sure it's at least as big as your number of CPUs) and then use a version of ToEnumerable() that returns only part of the first dimension. Something like:

private static IEnumerable<T> ToEnumerable<T>(this T[,,] array, int from, int to)
{
    for (int i = from; i < to; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < array.GetLength(1); j++)
        {
            for (int k = 0; k < array.GetLength(2); k++)
            {
                yield return array[i, j, k];
            }
        }
    }
}

Partitioner.Create(0, data.GetLength(0))
           .AsParallel()
           .Select(range => data.ToEnumerable(range.Item1, range.Item2).Min())
           .Min()

This is about twice as fast as the serial version on my computer. But this still has the overhead of enumerator, which is quite significant in this case: this version is about twice as fast as the above parallel code:

var length0 = data.GetLength(0);
var length1 = data.GetLength(1);
var length2 = data.GetLength(2);

float min = float.MaxValue;

for (int i = 0; i < length0; i++)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < length1; j++)
    {
        for (int k = 0; k < length2; k++)
        {
            float value = data[i, j, k];
            if (value < min)
                min = value;
        }
    }
}

return min;

And now we can parallelize this code, which results in about four times speedup (as before, we partition the first dimension and then continue serially):

var results = new ConcurrentQueue<float>();
var length1 = data.GetLength(1);
var length2 = data.GetLength(2);

Parallel.ForEach(
    Partitioner.Create(0, data.GetLength(0)), range =>
    {
        float min = float.MaxValue;

        for (int i = range.Item1; i < range.Item2; i++)
        {
            for (int j = 0; j < length1; j++)
            {
                for (int k = 0; k < length2; k++)
                {
                    float value = data[i, j, k];
                    if (value < min)
                        min = value;
                }
            }
        }

        results.Enqueue(min);
    });

return results.Min();

But wait! There's more. Multidimensional arrays are quite slow in .Net, so from a performance standpoint, it can make sense to use a jagged array (float[][][] instead of float[,,]), even if a multidimensional array fits better. Using this, we can get about 50 % more speedup:

dataJagged.AsParallel().Min(
    level1 =>
    {
        float min = float.MaxValue;

        foreach (var level2 in level1)
        {
            for (int k = 0; k < level2.Length; k++)
            {
                float value = level2[k];
                if (value < min)
                    min = value;
            }
        }

        return min;
    });

To sum up, there is a table of timings on my computer using the various approaches:

  • 3D array, ToEnumerable, serial: 18.6 s
  • 3D array, ToEnumerable, PLINQ: 7.4 s
  • 3D array, manual loops, serial: 4.0 s
  • 3D array, manual loops, Parallel.ForEach: 1.1 s
  • Jagged array, manual loops, serial: 2.4 s
  • Jagged array, manual loops, PLINQ: 0.8 s
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty stuck with the multidimensional arrays for the moment, but your other approaches give me some ideas, thank you! –  Rob Perkins Feb 3 at 18:30
    
How fast is that Enqueue() function, do you think? If it had a place inside the innermost loop and stored 4-tuples of (i,j,k,value) then I would have a way to do some sparse array work that I need elsewhere. –  Rob Perkins Feb 3 at 22:17
    
@RobPerkins If it's a sparse array, then I think it should be fast enough. But you'll have to measure that for yourself. –  svick Feb 4 at 1:54
    
svick, so far the timings are very good for my particular data set. The OrderablePartitioner is creating a partition for only two items in the array per partition, though, which is not something I expected. Unless that's normal with two 6-core hyperthreaded CPUs? –  Rob Perkins Feb 4 at 5:38
    
@RobPerkins You mean the Paritioner.Create()? That depends on how large your first dimension is. On my quad-core, it seems to always create something around 10-15 partitions. But if you don't like that, you can use an overload that lets you specify exactly what the size of partitions should be. –  svick Feb 4 at 10:23

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